2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211569
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND DEPRESSION IN OLD ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose: The current study has two overarching goals to assessing a) protective effects of physical activity on depression in a nationally representative sample of older adults (age ≥ 60) and 2) demographic factors that may be associated with Physical Activity (PA) and depression in this population. Background: Depression affects 1-5% of older adults and can lead to multiple negative consequences including impaired psychosocial functioning, higher morbidity and mortality, and increased risk of disease such as cardiovascular disease. Recent research suggests that PA is related to fewer depressive symptoms. It is important to explore levels of physical activity and their associations with depression in older adult populations specifically in order to assess the importance of incorporating physical activity into intervention strategies. Methods: A total of 810 older adults (age 60+, M=70.37) were used from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006. Participants were approximately 55% female and largely Caucasian (86.34%). Depression was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). PA was defined utilizing steps taken per day as measured by an accelerometer ActiGraph AM-7164 worn by participants for 7 days. Binary logistic regressions were used to analyze the data accounting for the complex sample design and sample weights of the NHANES data. Results: The average of PA was 7759.12 (SD=204.23) steps/day. 48.16% of the sample was classified as active/highly active (≥7500 steps/day), 27.69% as low activity (5000-7499steps/day), and 24.15 as sedentary (<5000 steps/day). The mean score of depression was 2.24 (SD=0.22). Active/highly active PA predicted fewer depressive symptoms (OR=0.32, p <.05) relative to sedentary PA, when controlling for the other demographic variables. Taking psychotropic medications (OR=2.74, p <.05), presence of chronic medical conditions (OR=6.37, p <.01), and low annual house income (<$45,000; OR=4.77, p <.05) were also significantly associated with moderate depressive symptoms. Age (OR=1.11, p <.001), being female (OR=1.37, p <.001), taking psychotropic medications (OR=1.50, p <.05), presence of chronic medical conditions (OR=1.92, p<.05), and low annual house income (OR=1.79, p<.05) were significantly associated with sedentary PA. Implications: Mental health clinicians should consider regular PA as an essential component of psychosocial interventions for the elderly with depression. The evident associations of chronic medical conditions, psychotropic medication use, and income with both depression and PA have research and clinical implications for designing and providing interventions for elderly individuals.
Keywords:
Depression; Older adults; Physical activity
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5497
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND DEPRESSION IN OLD ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211569-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The current study has two overarching goals to assessing a) protective effects of physical activity on depression in a nationally representative sample of older adults (age ≥ 60) and 2) demographic factors that may be associated with Physical Activity (PA) and depression in this population. Background: Depression affects 1-5% of older adults and can lead to multiple negative consequences including impaired psychosocial functioning, higher morbidity and mortality, and increased risk of disease such as cardiovascular disease. Recent research suggests that PA is related to fewer depressive symptoms. It is important to explore levels of physical activity and their associations with depression in older adult populations specifically in order to assess the importance of incorporating physical activity into intervention strategies. Methods: A total of 810 older adults (age 60+, M=70.37) were used from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006. Participants were approximately 55% female and largely Caucasian (86.34%). Depression was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). PA was defined utilizing steps taken per day as measured by an accelerometer ActiGraph AM-7164 worn by participants for 7 days. Binary logistic regressions were used to analyze the data accounting for the complex sample design and sample weights of the NHANES data. Results: The average of PA was 7759.12 (SD=204.23) steps/day. 48.16% of the sample was classified as active/highly active (≥7500 steps/day), 27.69% as low activity (5000-7499steps/day), and 24.15 as sedentary (<5000 steps/day). The mean score of depression was 2.24 (SD=0.22). Active/highly active PA predicted fewer depressive symptoms (OR=0.32, p <.05) relative to sedentary PA, when controlling for the other demographic variables. Taking psychotropic medications (OR=2.74, p <.05), presence of chronic medical conditions (OR=6.37, p <.01), and low annual house income (<$45,000; OR=4.77, p <.05) were also significantly associated with moderate depressive symptoms. Age (OR=1.11, p <.001), being female (OR=1.37, p <.001), taking psychotropic medications (OR=1.50, p <.05), presence of chronic medical conditions (OR=1.92, p<.05), and low annual house income (OR=1.79, p<.05) were significantly associated with sedentary PA. Implications: Mental health clinicians should consider regular PA as an essential component of psychosocial interventions for the elderly with depression. The evident associations of chronic medical conditions, psychotropic medication use, and income with both depression and PA have research and clinical implications for designing and providing interventions for elderly individuals.en_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:50Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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