2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211575
Type:
Research Study
Title:
APPALACHIAN CERVICAL CANCER KNOWLEDGE, BEHAVIORS, BELIEFS
Abstract:
Background: Rates of cervical cancer are higher in Appalachia when compared to other regions in the United States despite availability of free Pap smear testing and the HPV vaccine. While socioeconomics and cultural factors have been implicated as possible reasons, these relationships have not been clearly described. Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a data collection instrument, the Appalachian Cervical Cancer Knowledge, Behavior and Belief survey to assess knowledge behaviors and beliefs about cervical cancer in Appalachian women. Sample: A total of 237 women participated in the study. Of these twenty women participated in the pilot study to provide an initial examination of the instrument. Inclusion criteria consisted of age 21-64; English speaking; willingness to participate in the study; intact uterus; and residence in Appalachia.   Methods: An initial 53 item instrument was developed after a comprehensive literature review and using the researcher’s clinical background in Public Health and Nursing. Six experts with medical, nursing, public health and research backgrounds were selected to evaluate content validity of the 53 item instrument. The revised 40 item instrument was subsequently pilot tested with 20 women residing in Avery County, NC to evaluate the instrument for feasibility for administration; identify procedural problems; provide feedback regarding each item for retention or deletion; and identify any issues with the instrument. The resultant 32 item instrument was evaluated by three experts from Public Health and Nursing to evaluate the instrument for content validity of each item and the entire instrument. The revised instrument was then administered to a sample of 217 women. Results: A 32 item scale was the final product. Three experts from Public Health and Nursing found a favorable Item and Scale Content Index with no scores below 100% and no recommendations for additions or deletions to the 32 item survey. The instrument was then administered to 3 distinct groups of women within Appalachia. Exploratory factor analysis findings include a four factor solution, resulting in potential retention of 24 of 32 original items. Discussion: The instrument demonstrated validity to evaluate Appalachian knowledge, behaviors and beliefs of cervical cancer. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four factor solution with exploratory factor analysis and potential retention of 24 of the 32 items. Further testing is needed to strengthen the generalizability of the instrument and to address areas of improvement. Implications for nursing include use of research findings to provide focused interventions to reduce cervical cancer rates in this region.
Keywords:
Appalachian women; Cervical cancer
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5502
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleAPPALACHIAN CERVICAL CANCER KNOWLEDGE, BEHAVIORS, BELIEFSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211575-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Rates of cervical cancer are higher in Appalachia when compared to other regions in the United States despite availability of free Pap smear testing and the HPV vaccine. While socioeconomics and cultural factors have been implicated as possible reasons, these relationships have not been clearly described. Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a data collection instrument, the Appalachian Cervical Cancer Knowledge, Behavior and Belief survey to assess knowledge behaviors and beliefs about cervical cancer in Appalachian women. Sample: A total of 237 women participated in the study. Of these twenty women participated in the pilot study to provide an initial examination of the instrument. Inclusion criteria consisted of age 21-64; English speaking; willingness to participate in the study; intact uterus; and residence in Appalachia.   Methods: An initial 53 item instrument was developed after a comprehensive literature review and using the researcher’s clinical background in Public Health and Nursing. Six experts with medical, nursing, public health and research backgrounds were selected to evaluate content validity of the 53 item instrument. The revised 40 item instrument was subsequently pilot tested with 20 women residing in Avery County, NC to evaluate the instrument for feasibility for administration; identify procedural problems; provide feedback regarding each item for retention or deletion; and identify any issues with the instrument. The resultant 32 item instrument was evaluated by three experts from Public Health and Nursing to evaluate the instrument for content validity of each item and the entire instrument. The revised instrument was then administered to a sample of 217 women. Results: A 32 item scale was the final product. Three experts from Public Health and Nursing found a favorable Item and Scale Content Index with no scores below 100% and no recommendations for additions or deletions to the 32 item survey. The instrument was then administered to 3 distinct groups of women within Appalachia. Exploratory factor analysis findings include a four factor solution, resulting in potential retention of 24 of 32 original items. Discussion: The instrument demonstrated validity to evaluate Appalachian knowledge, behaviors and beliefs of cervical cancer. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four factor solution with exploratory factor analysis and potential retention of 24 of the 32 items. Further testing is needed to strengthen the generalizability of the instrument and to address areas of improvement. Implications for nursing include use of research findings to provide focused interventions to reduce cervical cancer rates in this region.en_GB
dc.subjectAppalachian womenen_GB
dc.subjectCervical canceren_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:10Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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