SERUM URIC ACID: A SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION TO DETERMINE ADOLESCENT HEALTH OUTCOMES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211578
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SERUM URIC ACID: A SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION TO DETERMINE ADOLESCENT HEALTH OUTCOMES
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe findings regarding serum uric acid levels (UA) in youth enrolled in the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study; 2) examine associations of UA with anthropometric measures and cardiometabolic markers in youth; and 3) compare gender difference in UA while controlling for central adiposity and cardiometabolic markers. Background: Elevated serum UA often precedes hypertension, obesity and kidney disease. Few studies have addressed UA in youth; it is associated with pediatric obesity but there is conflicting evidence about other associations. Research is needed to elucidate the normal ranges of UA in youth, the relationships of UA with health outcomes, and to establish usefulness of this biomarker in the science of nursing. Methods: Participants included 171students in middle school in the inland northwest who participated in the TEAMS study to encourage healthy lifestyles. Data reported is cross sectional with assessments of students completed at the start of the seventh grade. University and school district Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals were obtained. Student assessments included height, weight, BMI percentile, BP, and fasting serum blood draw according to CDC protocols. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample. A multivariate ANCOVA was completed to examine mean differences in UA based on gender while controlling for central adiposity and serum lipid levels. Results: 171 students were evaluated (71 male and 100 female). Among all subjects UA was normally distributed with mean and median of 4.9 mg/dL. Values were higher in obese (5.4 mg/dL) than non-obese (4.7 mg/dL) youth (p<0.001). No statistical differences were observed in males (5.1 mg/dL) and females (4.8 mg/dL) (p=0.08). UA levels were associated with BMI, waist circumference, c-peptide, insulin, triglycerides, HDL-C, hsCRP, HOMA-IR, and systolic blood pressure. Within a multivariate model describing more than 30% of the variance in serum UA, males had higher values compared to females (p=0.005), controlling for waist circumference and HDL-C. Implications: Youth health characteristics have been shown to continue into adulthood. Uric acid’s relationships with gender, central adiposity and cardiovascular markers in childhood demonstrate that UA is a marker that can be analyzed and evaluated among youth. In addition, common measurements obtained in office settings accurately reflect potentially harmful metabolic states in youth. While no recommendations have yet been made for normal serum UA levels in youth, this study contributes to findings and with other studies will provide a profile of UA in children and adolescents. Funding support: This project was supported by Agriculture and Food Initiative grant 2007-55215-17909 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Keywords:
Youth; Uric acid levels; Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5508
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSERUM URIC ACID: A SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION TO DETERMINE ADOLESCENT HEALTH OUTCOMESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211578-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe findings regarding serum uric acid levels (UA) in youth enrolled in the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study; 2) examine associations of UA with anthropometric measures and cardiometabolic markers in youth; and 3) compare gender difference in UA while controlling for central adiposity and cardiometabolic markers. Background: Elevated serum UA often precedes hypertension, obesity and kidney disease. Few studies have addressed UA in youth; it is associated with pediatric obesity but there is conflicting evidence about other associations. Research is needed to elucidate the normal ranges of UA in youth, the relationships of UA with health outcomes, and to establish usefulness of this biomarker in the science of nursing. Methods: Participants included 171students in middle school in the inland northwest who participated in the TEAMS study to encourage healthy lifestyles. Data reported is cross sectional with assessments of students completed at the start of the seventh grade. University and school district Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals were obtained. Student assessments included height, weight, BMI percentile, BP, and fasting serum blood draw according to CDC protocols. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample. A multivariate ANCOVA was completed to examine mean differences in UA based on gender while controlling for central adiposity and serum lipid levels. Results: 171 students were evaluated (71 male and 100 female). Among all subjects UA was normally distributed with mean and median of 4.9 mg/dL. Values were higher in obese (5.4 mg/dL) than non-obese (4.7 mg/dL) youth (p<0.001). No statistical differences were observed in males (5.1 mg/dL) and females (4.8 mg/dL) (p=0.08). UA levels were associated with BMI, waist circumference, c-peptide, insulin, triglycerides, HDL-C, hsCRP, HOMA-IR, and systolic blood pressure. Within a multivariate model describing more than 30% of the variance in serum UA, males had higher values compared to females (p=0.005), controlling for waist circumference and HDL-C. Implications: Youth health characteristics have been shown to continue into adulthood. Uric acid’s relationships with gender, central adiposity and cardiovascular markers in childhood demonstrate that UA is a marker that can be analyzed and evaluated among youth. In addition, common measurements obtained in office settings accurately reflect potentially harmful metabolic states in youth. While no recommendations have yet been made for normal serum UA levels in youth, this study contributes to findings and with other studies will provide a profile of UA in children and adolescents. Funding support: This project was supported by Agriculture and Food Initiative grant 2007-55215-17909 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.en_GB
dc.subjectYouthen_GB
dc.subjectUric acid levelsen_GB
dc.subjectTeen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schoolsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:21Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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