GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS PERCEPTIONS FOR PATIENTS WITH STABLE CORONARY DISEASE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211580
Type:
Research Study
Title:
GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS PERCEPTIONS FOR PATIENTS WITH STABLE CORONARY DISEASE
Abstract:
Rationale/Background:  More than 500,000 women die of cardiovascular disease each year, which exceeds the number of deaths in men and the next seven causes of death in women combined.  By understanding gender differences in illness perception (IP) after treatment for CAD, providers may be able to define educational strategies to help improve outcomes for this large population of patients.  Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare temporal changes in IP from baseline (post-procedure) to 30-days between men and women after treatment for stable CAD.  Conceptual Basis: Leventhal’s self-regulation model was used as the conceptual model for this study.  Leventhal’s model outlines a response to illness which involves the development of a cognitive representation, action plan, and appraisal process.  Methods: In this prospective design, a convenience sample of CAD patients (n=180; men n= 129, women n=51) were recruited after cardiac catheterization.  Data collection occurred at baseline (post-procedure) and 30-days after discharge. Seven dimensions of IP as described by Leventhal’s model (1-Timeline Acute/Chronic, 2-Timeline Cyclical, 3-Consequences, 4-Personal Control, 5-Treatment Control,6- Illness Coherence, and 7-Emotional Representation) were measured with the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R).  The IPQ-R was completed during interview at baseline and via mail at 30-days.  At 30-days, 52.8% of surveys were returned (men n=74, women n=21).  Results: Men and women experience shifts in IP within the first 30-days after treatment.  Both groups had a significant increase in Illness Coherence from baseline to 30-days (Men: baseline m=13.5, SD=7.6, 30-days m=17.2, SD=5.7, t=-5.28, p<001; Women baseline m=17.6, SD=6.9, 30-days m=21.9, SD=.83, t=-2.50, p=.021), which demonstrates improvements in perceived understanding of their illness.  Men had an increase in Timeline (Cyclical) (baseline m=6.9, SD=2.7, 30-days m=9.1, SD=4.3, t=-4.34, p<.001) and reduced Treatment Control scores from baseline to 30-days (baseline m=15.6, SD=2.4, 30-days m=14.8, SD=2.6, t=2.54, p=.013).  Therefore, men continued to experience symptoms and were more likely to perceive their treatment plan as less effective in managing their illness.  Women demonstrated higher Personal Control (baseline m=16.0, SD=4.7, 30-days m=18.1, SD=3.6, t=-4.13, p=.001) and lower Emotional Representation (baseline m=13.3, SD=3.7, 30-days m=10.6, SD=1.8, t=3.71, p=.001) from baseline to 30-days, suggesting an improved perception of personal control over their prescribed treatment plan as well as a negative emotional response within 30-days after treatment.  Implications: Knowledge of gender differences in IP will enable providers to develop tailored interventions to improve long-term, secondary prevention outcomes in stable CAD populations.
Keywords:
Gender differences; Illness perception; Cardiovascular disease
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5516
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleGENDER DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS PERCEPTIONS FOR PATIENTS WITH STABLE CORONARY DISEASEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211580-
dc.description.abstractRationale/Background:  More than 500,000 women die of cardiovascular disease each year, which exceeds the number of deaths in men and the next seven causes of death in women combined.  By understanding gender differences in illness perception (IP) after treatment for CAD, providers may be able to define educational strategies to help improve outcomes for this large population of patients.  Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare temporal changes in IP from baseline (post-procedure) to 30-days between men and women after treatment for stable CAD.  Conceptual Basis: Leventhal’s self-regulation model was used as the conceptual model for this study.  Leventhal’s model outlines a response to illness which involves the development of a cognitive representation, action plan, and appraisal process.  Methods: In this prospective design, a convenience sample of CAD patients (n=180; men n= 129, women n=51) were recruited after cardiac catheterization.  Data collection occurred at baseline (post-procedure) and 30-days after discharge. Seven dimensions of IP as described by Leventhal’s model (1-Timeline Acute/Chronic, 2-Timeline Cyclical, 3-Consequences, 4-Personal Control, 5-Treatment Control,6- Illness Coherence, and 7-Emotional Representation) were measured with the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R).  The IPQ-R was completed during interview at baseline and via mail at 30-days.  At 30-days, 52.8% of surveys were returned (men n=74, women n=21).  Results: Men and women experience shifts in IP within the first 30-days after treatment.  Both groups had a significant increase in Illness Coherence from baseline to 30-days (Men: baseline m=13.5, SD=7.6, 30-days m=17.2, SD=5.7, t=-5.28, p<001; Women baseline m=17.6, SD=6.9, 30-days m=21.9, SD=.83, t=-2.50, p=.021), which demonstrates improvements in perceived understanding of their illness.  Men had an increase in Timeline (Cyclical) (baseline m=6.9, SD=2.7, 30-days m=9.1, SD=4.3, t=-4.34, p<.001) and reduced Treatment Control scores from baseline to 30-days (baseline m=15.6, SD=2.4, 30-days m=14.8, SD=2.6, t=2.54, p=.013).  Therefore, men continued to experience symptoms and were more likely to perceive their treatment plan as less effective in managing their illness.  Women demonstrated higher Personal Control (baseline m=16.0, SD=4.7, 30-days m=18.1, SD=3.6, t=-4.13, p=.001) and lower Emotional Representation (baseline m=13.3, SD=3.7, 30-days m=10.6, SD=1.8, t=3.71, p=.001) from baseline to 30-days, suggesting an improved perception of personal control over their prescribed treatment plan as well as a negative emotional response within 30-days after treatment.  Implications: Knowledge of gender differences in IP will enable providers to develop tailored interventions to improve long-term, secondary prevention outcomes in stable CAD populations.en_GB
dc.subjectGender differencesen_GB
dc.subjectIllness perceptionen_GB
dc.subjectCardiovascular diseaseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:28Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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