2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211586
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FOOD LABEL LITERACY AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES IN PACIFIC ISLANDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: This study described the relationship between food label health literacy and demographic variables in a sample of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) caregiving adults. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Obesity often co-exists with under-nutrition, creating a complex situation for nearly all ages and socioeconomic groups. NHOPIs experience this double-burden; one reason may be that many are in a transition from an era of under-nutrition to an era of dietary excess. This dietary excess often leads to obesity and related complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. A possible contributor to this problem is inadequate food label literacy, defined as the ability to read, interpret, and apply information on food labels to decisions about nutrition. Misinterpreting food labels can lead to an inadequate intake of calories and nutrients or to an overindulgent calorie intake. Understanding food labels is important for people with chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or food allergies. They are better prepared to follow dietary recommendations if able to interpret and apply information on food labels. However, no study could be found on NHOPIs and food label literacy. Methods: 365 NHOPI adults in Hawaii and Utah participated. Each was a caregiver of at least one child. Data were collected at grocery stores and a preschool in two Hawaiian Islands (n=209) and at NHOPI events in Utah (n=156). Our questionnaire included: (1) demographics, (2) Pfizer’s Newest Vital Sign Score Sheet, a food label literacy questionnaire, and (3) questions about caregivers’ food-serving practices and activity promotion for children. Participants’ weight and height were measured. Results: Nearly half (45%) the sample had evidence of limited food label literacy. Although there was no significant difference between participants’ food label literacy scores in Hawaii and Utah, other demographic variables were related to food label literacy. Food label literacy scores were significantly different based on gender, age, level of education, and income. Implications: Future research on effective food label instruction is needed. Meanwhile, nurses should not assume NHOPI patients and families understand food labels. When teaching about dietary needs and restrictions, nurses need to review critical information on food labels and role-play how to use this information when making food choices. Nurses should advocate for instruction about food labels in elementary and high schools. Instruction on food labels would be a helpful addition to social marketing and community classes and workshops. Finally, nurses can lobby for simpler, more uniform food labels. Funding: This study was funded by Brigham Young University grants, including a Graduate Mentoring Grant, the Elaine Dyer Award, and a Mentoring Environment Grant.
Keywords:
Adult caregivers; Food label health literacy
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5529
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFOOD LABEL LITERACY AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES IN PACIFIC ISLANDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211586-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: This study described the relationship between food label health literacy and demographic variables in a sample of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) caregiving adults. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Obesity often co-exists with under-nutrition, creating a complex situation for nearly all ages and socioeconomic groups. NHOPIs experience this double-burden; one reason may be that many are in a transition from an era of under-nutrition to an era of dietary excess. This dietary excess often leads to obesity and related complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. A possible contributor to this problem is inadequate food label literacy, defined as the ability to read, interpret, and apply information on food labels to decisions about nutrition. Misinterpreting food labels can lead to an inadequate intake of calories and nutrients or to an overindulgent calorie intake. Understanding food labels is important for people with chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or food allergies. They are better prepared to follow dietary recommendations if able to interpret and apply information on food labels. However, no study could be found on NHOPIs and food label literacy. Methods: 365 NHOPI adults in Hawaii and Utah participated. Each was a caregiver of at least one child. Data were collected at grocery stores and a preschool in two Hawaiian Islands (n=209) and at NHOPI events in Utah (n=156). Our questionnaire included: (1) demographics, (2) Pfizer’s Newest Vital Sign Score Sheet, a food label literacy questionnaire, and (3) questions about caregivers’ food-serving practices and activity promotion for children. Participants’ weight and height were measured. Results: Nearly half (45%) the sample had evidence of limited food label literacy. Although there was no significant difference between participants’ food label literacy scores in Hawaii and Utah, other demographic variables were related to food label literacy. Food label literacy scores were significantly different based on gender, age, level of education, and income. Implications: Future research on effective food label instruction is needed. Meanwhile, nurses should not assume NHOPI patients and families understand food labels. When teaching about dietary needs and restrictions, nurses need to review critical information on food labels and role-play how to use this information when making food choices. Nurses should advocate for instruction about food labels in elementary and high schools. Instruction on food labels would be a helpful addition to social marketing and community classes and workshops. Finally, nurses can lobby for simpler, more uniform food labels. Funding: This study was funded by Brigham Young University grants, including a Graduate Mentoring Grant, the Elaine Dyer Award, and a Mentoring Environment Grant.en_GB
dc.subjectAdult caregiversen_GB
dc.subjectFood label health literacyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:49Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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