2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211587
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TRANSITIONAL CARE MEDICATION SAFETY: STAKEHOLDERS' PERSPECTIVES
Abstract:
Purpose:  To identify barriers to and solutions for accurate and complete medication information transfer during patients’ transition from hospital to home. Rationale/Conceptual Basis: Medication errors are the most prevalent adverse event following hospital discharge. Approximately 90% of patients who are discharged from acute care to home care have at least 1, with an average of 4, medication discrepancies. Despite these astounding findings, indicating widespread potential for patient harm and increased medical liability, proactive risk management during care transitions is virtually nonexistent. The Patient Safety Management Framework guides this study which will fulfill a critical need of linking medication risk management strategies to emerging transitional care models. Methods: An IRB-approved descriptive study using data gleaned from stakeholder focus groups is being completed. Segregated focus groups (N=10) comprised of patients and family members from urban hospitals (n=11), patients and family members from rural hospitals (n=6), ambulatory care and hospitalist physicians (n=7), urban hospital nurses (n=5), rural hospital nurses (n=7), home care nurses (n=4), retail and acute care pharmacists (n=8), acute care, home care and long-term care social workers (n=12), health plan contract administrators (n=3), and health care lawyers (n=6), were asked to reflect on, or make sense of,  selected case studies that captured critical safety and medical liability risk characteristics. The selected case studies were based on actual medication discrepancies and the associated outcomes, with details changed to ensure patient confidentiality. Focus group participants’ perspectives about the causes and contributing factors that led to adverse event(s) were captured by guiding stakeholder groups to participate in a root cause analysis. Participant comments were audio recorded and field notes were taken by two members of the research team during each focus group. Results: Themes and antecedent structure, process and outcome factors that contribute to errors are being delineated. Evidence based risk management strategies to maximize medication safety during hospital to community care transitions will be suggested. Implications: Stakeholder focus groups provided unique perspectives about factors that contribute to medication discrepancies, including the relatively unexplored legal and ethical issues. Collective stakeholder data will be used to design best practice risk management strategies for transitional care. This knowledge can, in turn, be used to define the best metrics to monitor the effectiveness of medication safety during transitional care.
Keywords:
Medication errors prevention and control
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5536
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTRANSITIONAL CARE MEDICATION SAFETY: STAKEHOLDERS' PERSPECTIVESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211587-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:  To identify barriers to and solutions for accurate and complete medication information transfer during patients’ transition from hospital to home. Rationale/Conceptual Basis: Medication errors are the most prevalent adverse event following hospital discharge. Approximately 90% of patients who are discharged from acute care to home care have at least 1, with an average of 4, medication discrepancies. Despite these astounding findings, indicating widespread potential for patient harm and increased medical liability, proactive risk management during care transitions is virtually nonexistent. The Patient Safety Management Framework guides this study which will fulfill a critical need of linking medication risk management strategies to emerging transitional care models. Methods: An IRB-approved descriptive study using data gleaned from stakeholder focus groups is being completed. Segregated focus groups (N=10) comprised of patients and family members from urban hospitals (n=11), patients and family members from rural hospitals (n=6), ambulatory care and hospitalist physicians (n=7), urban hospital nurses (n=5), rural hospital nurses (n=7), home care nurses (n=4), retail and acute care pharmacists (n=8), acute care, home care and long-term care social workers (n=12), health plan contract administrators (n=3), and health care lawyers (n=6), were asked to reflect on, or make sense of,  selected case studies that captured critical safety and medical liability risk characteristics. The selected case studies were based on actual medication discrepancies and the associated outcomes, with details changed to ensure patient confidentiality. Focus group participants’ perspectives about the causes and contributing factors that led to adverse event(s) were captured by guiding stakeholder groups to participate in a root cause analysis. Participant comments were audio recorded and field notes were taken by two members of the research team during each focus group. Results: Themes and antecedent structure, process and outcome factors that contribute to errors are being delineated. Evidence based risk management strategies to maximize medication safety during hospital to community care transitions will be suggested. Implications: Stakeholder focus groups provided unique perspectives about factors that contribute to medication discrepancies, including the relatively unexplored legal and ethical issues. Collective stakeholder data will be used to design best practice risk management strategies for transitional care. This knowledge can, in turn, be used to define the best metrics to monitor the effectiveness of medication safety during transitional care.en_GB
dc.subjectMedication errors prevention and controlen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:52Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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