2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211588
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ENGAGING IN LEARNING TOGETHER: A GROUNDED THEORY OF POLITICAL LEARNING
Abstract:
Background. Political and policy making skills are required in nursing graduate education (AACN, 2010). Undergraduate students also need to acquire and use political skills in their nursing practice (AACN, 2008; Institute of Medicine, 2010). These skills are needed for parity with other disciplines and to enter decision-making conversations about health and policy in workplaces, communities, and governmental spheres (Cohen et al., 1996). Political and policy making skills are seldom innate to nursing and are often foreign, intimidating and uninteresting to nurses and students. While nursing literature is replete with “how to’s” of political advocacy and skills (Abood, 2007) and offers wisdom for teaching students (Byrd et al., 2004), no research was found on how nursing students actually learn political concepts and skills. In our public university school of nursing, a unique hybrid online course-- Policy, Power, & Voice is required for undergraduate students. Studying how learning occurred in this course is consistent with calls to scrutinize and document teaching and learning in nursing (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010; Boyer, 1996). Aims. A constructivist emergent grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006) study was done and guided by two questions. 1) How do undergraduate nursing students, in one online hybrid course, make sense of civic engagement processes like policy making and political advocacy, which are often seen as unrelated to nursing? 2) During this course, how do these students progress in integrating these civic engagement processes into their views of nursing? Methods. Students who took the course in spring semester 2011 were invited to participate after course grades were submitted. Fourteen students consented to semi-structured interviews with the researcher who was also teacher of the course. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Charmaz’s (2006) method of coding and the constant comparative process (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Interviews were supported with data from course documents and communications, teacher notes, and participants gave e-mail input on a grounded theory draft. Results. Engaging in Learning Together emerged as the core category. Four primary processes were involved: Push Starting Learning, Doing the Work, Learning Online (OL) Together, and Making it Real. Through Engaging in Learning Together, students created new understandings of political processes, the profession of nursing, and the idea of political processes as connected to nursing. At the beginning of the course, about three-fourths of participants felt they were complete novices or uninterested in politics. By course end, all experienced new insights about politics, participation in political processes, and expanded views of nursing incorporating a political dimension. Participants found their learning, deep, meaningful, interesting and satisfying. Implications. This study has improved teaching in this course and program and provides evidence for course and curricular policy decisions. It contributes to nursing literature by adding rich evidence about undergraduate students’ learning in political processes and policy making and  provides a foundation for further research into how students’ learn and integrate political processes into their nursing practice. It provides insights for teaching political concepts and for deep learning, particularly in programs with similar hybrid learning contexts.
Keywords:
Nursing education; Political skills; Policy making skills
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5537
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleENGAGING IN LEARNING TOGETHER: A GROUNDED THEORY OF POLITICAL LEARNINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211588-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Political and policy making skills are required in nursing graduate education (AACN, 2010). Undergraduate students also need to acquire and use political skills in their nursing practice (AACN, 2008; Institute of Medicine, 2010). These skills are needed for parity with other disciplines and to enter decision-making conversations about health and policy in workplaces, communities, and governmental spheres (Cohen et al., 1996). Political and policy making skills are seldom innate to nursing and are often foreign, intimidating and uninteresting to nurses and students. While nursing literature is replete with “how to’s” of political advocacy and skills (Abood, 2007) and offers wisdom for teaching students (Byrd et al., 2004), no research was found on how nursing students actually learn political concepts and skills. In our public university school of nursing, a unique hybrid online course-- Policy, Power, & Voice is required for undergraduate students. Studying how learning occurred in this course is consistent with calls to scrutinize and document teaching and learning in nursing (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010; Boyer, 1996). Aims. A constructivist emergent grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006) study was done and guided by two questions. 1) How do undergraduate nursing students, in one online hybrid course, make sense of civic engagement processes like policy making and political advocacy, which are often seen as unrelated to nursing? 2) During this course, how do these students progress in integrating these civic engagement processes into their views of nursing? Methods. Students who took the course in spring semester 2011 were invited to participate after course grades were submitted. Fourteen students consented to semi-structured interviews with the researcher who was also teacher of the course. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Charmaz’s (2006) method of coding and the constant comparative process (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Interviews were supported with data from course documents and communications, teacher notes, and participants gave e-mail input on a grounded theory draft. Results. Engaging in Learning Together emerged as the core category. Four primary processes were involved: Push Starting Learning, Doing the Work, Learning Online (OL) Together, and Making it Real. Through Engaging in Learning Together, students created new understandings of political processes, the profession of nursing, and the idea of political processes as connected to nursing. At the beginning of the course, about three-fourths of participants felt they were complete novices or uninterested in politics. By course end, all experienced new insights about politics, participation in political processes, and expanded views of nursing incorporating a political dimension. Participants found their learning, deep, meaningful, interesting and satisfying. Implications. This study has improved teaching in this course and program and provides evidence for course and curricular policy decisions. It contributes to nursing literature by adding rich evidence about undergraduate students’ learning in political processes and policy making and  provides a foundation for further research into how students’ learn and integrate political processes into their nursing practice. It provides insights for teaching political concepts and for deep learning, particularly in programs with similar hybrid learning contexts.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectPolitical skillsen_GB
dc.subjectPolicy making skillsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:03:55Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:03:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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