PREDICTORS OF PROGRAM ATTENDANCE FOR A GROUP BASED HIV/AIDS SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211590
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PREDICTORS OF PROGRAM ATTENDANCE FOR A GROUP BASED HIV/AIDS SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: This pilot study tested the feasibility of implementing the group-based Positive Self Management Program (PSMP) to participants living with HIV/AIDS on Oahu, Hawaii. One hypothesis was that increased client satisfaction with aspects of program curricula, structure and activities would be associated with increased attendance.  Rationale/Background: Group-based interventions that enhance HIV disease self-management skills are important, as this chronic illness now requires years of management during times of dwindling resources. Group programs can engender efficient use of resources, but participants must be willing to attend the sessions for full benefit.  Attendance may be influenced by multiple factors including past experience with group involvement, topics addressed, learning activities utilized, and program structuring.  Conceptual Basis: The PSMP self-management program is grounded in Social Cognitive Theory with a focus on enhancing self-efficacy beliefs for behavior change.  Examples of topics addressed during the seven weekly 2-hour group PSMP sessions include managing the physiological and psychological aspects of HIV illness, adherence to HIV treatment regimes, symptom management, and fostering healthy lifestyle behaviors. Examples of learning activities include goal setting, action planning and homework. Program structure included two trained HIV-positive lay leaders, all HIV-positive participants, setting, location, and incentives for group participation.  Methods: Using a randomized wait-list control design, participants (n = 37) were recruited via convenience sampling and active outreach. Certified PSMP group leaders delivered the manualized PSMP.  Program feasibility analyses included enrollment and retention data with pooled data from participant satisfaction survey questions administered after the intervention group (n = 16).  Scales were developed to measure satisfaction with program structure, topics and learning activities.  Cronbach alphas for these scales ranged from .87 - .94. Results: Participants were mostly male (87%), Caucasian (43%), Asian/Pacific Islander (25%), or of mixed race (13%), with a mean age of 46 years. The average attendance rate was 83% (M = 5.8 sessions, range = 4 - 7). Regressions showed that previous group experience was associated with group attendance such that those with more group experience attended fewer sessions (β =- 2.1; p = .03). None of the factors for group structure, program topics or learning activities were significantly associated with session attendance (p >.05).  Implications: With the power limitations of this pilot study notwithstanding, HIV-positive persons with past group experience may need additional encouragement from nurses to attend group sessions to ensure the full impact of the intervention. Other aspects of the group, such as the social environment, group cohesion or group processes may play a larger role in attendance for HIV participants in this chronic disease self-management program.
Keywords:
HIV/AIDS; Positive Self Management Program; Hawaii
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5547
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePREDICTORS OF PROGRAM ATTENDANCE FOR A GROUP BASED HIV/AIDS SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAMen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211590-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: This pilot study tested the feasibility of implementing the group-based Positive Self Management Program (PSMP) to participants living with HIV/AIDS on Oahu, Hawaii. One hypothesis was that increased client satisfaction with aspects of program curricula, structure and activities would be associated with increased attendance.  Rationale/Background: Group-based interventions that enhance HIV disease self-management skills are important, as this chronic illness now requires years of management during times of dwindling resources. Group programs can engender efficient use of resources, but participants must be willing to attend the sessions for full benefit.  Attendance may be influenced by multiple factors including past experience with group involvement, topics addressed, learning activities utilized, and program structuring.  Conceptual Basis: The PSMP self-management program is grounded in Social Cognitive Theory with a focus on enhancing self-efficacy beliefs for behavior change.  Examples of topics addressed during the seven weekly 2-hour group PSMP sessions include managing the physiological and psychological aspects of HIV illness, adherence to HIV treatment regimes, symptom management, and fostering healthy lifestyle behaviors. Examples of learning activities include goal setting, action planning and homework. Program structure included two trained HIV-positive lay leaders, all HIV-positive participants, setting, location, and incentives for group participation.  Methods: Using a randomized wait-list control design, participants (n = 37) were recruited via convenience sampling and active outreach. Certified PSMP group leaders delivered the manualized PSMP.  Program feasibility analyses included enrollment and retention data with pooled data from participant satisfaction survey questions administered after the intervention group (n = 16).  Scales were developed to measure satisfaction with program structure, topics and learning activities.  Cronbach alphas for these scales ranged from .87 - .94. Results: Participants were mostly male (87%), Caucasian (43%), Asian/Pacific Islander (25%), or of mixed race (13%), with a mean age of 46 years. The average attendance rate was 83% (M = 5.8 sessions, range = 4 - 7). Regressions showed that previous group experience was associated with group attendance such that those with more group experience attended fewer sessions (β =- 2.1; p = .03). None of the factors for group structure, program topics or learning activities were significantly associated with session attendance (p >.05).  Implications: With the power limitations of this pilot study notwithstanding, HIV-positive persons with past group experience may need additional encouragement from nurses to attend group sessions to ensure the full impact of the intervention. Other aspects of the group, such as the social environment, group cohesion or group processes may play a larger role in attendance for HIV participants in this chronic disease self-management program.en_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.subjectPositive Self Management Programen_GB
dc.subjectHawaiien_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:02Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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