IMPACT OF PROVIDER'S ASSESSMENT on WOMEN'S KNOWLEDGE OF CONSEQUENCES OF SMOKING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211592
Type:
Research Study
Title:
IMPACT OF PROVIDER'S ASSESSMENT on WOMEN'S KNOWLEDGE OF CONSEQUENCES OF SMOKING
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The first aim of the study was to identify women’s level of knowledge about the health consequences of smoking, smoking during pregnancy, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. The second aim was to compare levels of knowledge for those who reported that the health care provider asked about smoking behavior, environmental smoke exposure, and offered assistance in smoking cessation to those who reported that the health care provider had not asked these questions or offered assistance in smoking cessation. Rationale/Background: In Wyoming, 22.1% of adults smoke cigarettes and 21.8% have no rule prohibiting smoking in the home. Method: A convenience sample of 366 women who were surveyed in a women’s health clinic. As part of a larger study, women were asked whether their health care provider asked about smoking behavior, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and offered assistance in smoking cessation. Knowledge was tested using 27 questions about the health consequences of smoking cigarettes, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and smoking during pregnancy. Results: Health care providers asked 86% of the women (n=318) about smoking behavior. The mean knowledge score was 24.19 (SD=5.00) for this group and 21. 58 (SD= 7.89) for the group who were not screened for smoking behavior (t = 2.22, df = 52.85, p = .031). The mean difference of 2.60 with equal variances not assumed yielded a 95% CI of (.25, 4.95). Health care providers asked 54% about environmental tobacco smoke exposure.  The mean knowledge was 24.34 (SD=5.14) for those screened and 23.25 (SD=5.91) for those not screened (t = 1.89, df = 364, p = .06). The mean difference of 1.09 with equal variances assumed yielded a 95% CI of (-.05, 2.23). Of the 366 respondents, 40 were identified as smokers. For the item, my doctor/nurse offered to help me quit smoking, 24 (60%) responded yes and 16 (40%) responded no. Mean knowledge was 24.67 (SD=4.21) for the yes group and 24.19 (SD= 3.58) for the no group (t = .37, df = 38, p = .71). The mean difference of .48 with equal variances assumed yielded a 95% CI of (-2.12, 3.07). Implications: Level of knowledge related to the consequences surrounding smoking behavior is greater if the health care provider addresses the question of smoking behavior.
Keywords:
Smoking cessation; Women; Smoking health risks
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5550
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleIMPACT OF PROVIDER'S ASSESSMENT on WOMEN'S KNOWLEDGE OF CONSEQUENCES OF SMOKINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211592-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The first aim of the study was to identify women’s level of knowledge about the health consequences of smoking, smoking during pregnancy, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. The second aim was to compare levels of knowledge for those who reported that the health care provider asked about smoking behavior, environmental smoke exposure, and offered assistance in smoking cessation to those who reported that the health care provider had not asked these questions or offered assistance in smoking cessation. Rationale/Background: In Wyoming, 22.1% of adults smoke cigarettes and 21.8% have no rule prohibiting smoking in the home. Method: A convenience sample of 366 women who were surveyed in a women’s health clinic. As part of a larger study, women were asked whether their health care provider asked about smoking behavior, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and offered assistance in smoking cessation. Knowledge was tested using 27 questions about the health consequences of smoking cigarettes, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and smoking during pregnancy. Results: Health care providers asked 86% of the women (n=318) about smoking behavior. The mean knowledge score was 24.19 (SD=5.00) for this group and 21. 58 (SD= 7.89) for the group who were not screened for smoking behavior (t = 2.22, df = 52.85, p = .031). The mean difference of 2.60 with equal variances not assumed yielded a 95% CI of (.25, 4.95). Health care providers asked 54% about environmental tobacco smoke exposure.  The mean knowledge was 24.34 (SD=5.14) for those screened and 23.25 (SD=5.91) for those not screened (t = 1.89, df = 364, p = .06). The mean difference of 1.09 with equal variances assumed yielded a 95% CI of (-.05, 2.23). Of the 366 respondents, 40 were identified as smokers. For the item, my doctor/nurse offered to help me quit smoking, 24 (60%) responded yes and 16 (40%) responded no. Mean knowledge was 24.67 (SD=4.21) for the yes group and 24.19 (SD= 3.58) for the no group (t = .37, df = 38, p = .71). The mean difference of .48 with equal variances assumed yielded a 95% CI of (-2.12, 3.07). Implications: Level of knowledge related to the consequences surrounding smoking behavior is greater if the health care provider addresses the question of smoking behavior.en_GB
dc.subjectSmoking cessationen_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.subjectSmoking health risksen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:09Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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