2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211593
Type:
Research Study
Title:
STRESS SELF-MANAGEMENT AMONG PRE-LICENSURE NURSING STUDENTS
Abstract:
Background and Rationale: Nursing students are especially susceptible to stress as they are required to maintain a complex schedule and rigorous academic workload combined with personal family and employment commitments. Knowledge in this area has been primarily informed by quantitative research via instruments to measure stress levels (Gibbons, Dempster, & Moutray, 2007). Early research has identified interventions that may be effective in reducing stress in nursing students. However, gaps remain regarding how students self-manage stress and the effectiveness of these interventions (Charlesworth, Murphy, & Beautler, 1981). In 1975, Seyle identified stress as “the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it.”  Stress severity is gauged by the level of disruption experienced when coping is not effective (Charlesworth, Murphy & Beutler, 1981). Excessive stress results in a decrease in individual performance, a concern that yields potential program failure, personal health issues, and/or negative patient care outcomes. Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this grounded theory study is to gain an understanding of the process regarding stress self-management in pre-licensure nursing students by answering the research question: What are the major processes through which pre-licensure student nurses’ self-manage stress? The aims of this study are to identify: 1) methods of self-management of stress in pre-licensure nursing students, 2) variations in self-management of stress among nursing students, 3) an emergent theory that addresses stress self-management, and 4) areas for future development of effective stress management strategies for pre-licensure nursing students. Methods: An initial sample followed by theoretical sampling technique will be employed. English-speaking male and female pre-licensure nursing students and faculty actively enrolled or teaching in an on-ground/campus-based nursing course in a pre-licensure program will be recruited to take part in this study.  Initially, up to 30 nursing students and 12 nursing faculty will be recruited.  Recruitment via posted flyers in common nursing student and faculty areas, nursing email distribution lists, and word-of-mouth (snow-ball effect) will be used. Data collection with occur over six months with separate student and faculty focus groups. Two additional focus groups may occur to ensure data saturation.  Interviews will be transcribed and verified for accuracy by participant review.  Open coding will be used to identify experiences, thoughts, and behaviors.  Codes will then be compared across transcripts to identify consistencies and differences followed by axial coding for categorizing findings.  Extensive use of thick, rich descriptions, a detailed audit trail, and peer debriefing will contribute to the trustworthiness of this study. Implications: The purpose of this study is to gain knowledge through inductive inquiry regarding how pre-licensure nursing students self-manage stress, culminating in an emerging theoretical framework.  A better understanding of potential program/curriculum revisions that potentially decrease stress will decrease the risk of negative stress response implications, such as program failure, personal health issues and/or negative patient care outcomes.
Keywords:
Nursing students; Stress levels; self management
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5556
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSTRESS SELF-MANAGEMENT AMONG PRE-LICENSURE NURSING STUDENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211593-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Rationale: Nursing students are especially susceptible to stress as they are required to maintain a complex schedule and rigorous academic workload combined with personal family and employment commitments. Knowledge in this area has been primarily informed by quantitative research via instruments to measure stress levels (Gibbons, Dempster, & Moutray, 2007). Early research has identified interventions that may be effective in reducing stress in nursing students. However, gaps remain regarding how students self-manage stress and the effectiveness of these interventions (Charlesworth, Murphy, & Beautler, 1981). In 1975, Seyle identified stress as “the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it.”  Stress severity is gauged by the level of disruption experienced when coping is not effective (Charlesworth, Murphy & Beutler, 1981). Excessive stress results in a decrease in individual performance, a concern that yields potential program failure, personal health issues, and/or negative patient care outcomes. Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this grounded theory study is to gain an understanding of the process regarding stress self-management in pre-licensure nursing students by answering the research question: What are the major processes through which pre-licensure student nurses’ self-manage stress? The aims of this study are to identify: 1) methods of self-management of stress in pre-licensure nursing students, 2) variations in self-management of stress among nursing students, 3) an emergent theory that addresses stress self-management, and 4) areas for future development of effective stress management strategies for pre-licensure nursing students. Methods: An initial sample followed by theoretical sampling technique will be employed. English-speaking male and female pre-licensure nursing students and faculty actively enrolled or teaching in an on-ground/campus-based nursing course in a pre-licensure program will be recruited to take part in this study.  Initially, up to 30 nursing students and 12 nursing faculty will be recruited.  Recruitment via posted flyers in common nursing student and faculty areas, nursing email distribution lists, and word-of-mouth (snow-ball effect) will be used. Data collection with occur over six months with separate student and faculty focus groups. Two additional focus groups may occur to ensure data saturation.  Interviews will be transcribed and verified for accuracy by participant review.  Open coding will be used to identify experiences, thoughts, and behaviors.  Codes will then be compared across transcripts to identify consistencies and differences followed by axial coding for categorizing findings.  Extensive use of thick, rich descriptions, a detailed audit trail, and peer debriefing will contribute to the trustworthiness of this study. Implications: The purpose of this study is to gain knowledge through inductive inquiry regarding how pre-licensure nursing students self-manage stress, culminating in an emerging theoretical framework.  A better understanding of potential program/curriculum revisions that potentially decrease stress will decrease the risk of negative stress response implications, such as program failure, personal health issues and/or negative patient care outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectStress levelsen_GB
dc.subjectself managementen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:12Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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