2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211594
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PAIN OF OSTEOARTHRITIS IN WOMEN: ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH (PHASE I)
Abstract:
Aim: The aim of this study is to describe pain symptom experiences of women with osteoarthritis (OA) in outdoor environments. Rationale:  Symptom Management Theory (SMT; originally called the Symptom Management Model; Dodd et al., 2001), includes the physical environment as a factor that may influence pain.  Outdoor environments may contribute to pain management through multiple mechanisms, including distraction by means of engaging and fascinating multisensory stimuli of nature. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study uses qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of 16 women, 65 years and older, with OA pain.  Participants live in independent apartments at one of four retirement community sites. These sites were selected, from among 13 sites evaluated, for specific outdoor environment characteristics.  Each site has two outdoor spaces (e.g., a courtyard) with different levels (one higher and one lower) of multi-sensory nature, measured objectively using the Access to Nature Outdoor Environment Tool-Revised.  In-depth individual interviews were held with women about their pain experiences and how they respond in these particular outdoor spaces.   The interviews are being transcribed verbatim, with person and place de-identified, and transcripts are verified for accuracy.  Transcripts will be analyzed through directed content analysis, using SMT concepts and looking for patterns in ways the outdoor spaces with different levels of multi-sensory nature might affect OA pain.  Two methodological experts in content analysis, from nursing and environmental psychology, will provide consensual validation of the coding and assure trustworthiness of the qualitative data. Results:  Field notes and methodological memos are informing the content analysis.  The 16 women interviewed range in age from 70 to 92.  All of the women reported OA pain during the previous week, ranging from 3 to 10 (on a scale of 0 to 10).  Fourteen of the women reported experiencing pain on most days in the previous week.  The women discussed their OA pain, pain management, and their pain experiences when outdoors generally and in the identified spaces. Implications:  The findings will be used in the development of a SMT model relevant for older women with OA in regard to pain symptom experiences and outdoor environments.  Increased understanding of how older women with OA pain use and experience different outdoor environments will provide important insights about the influence of environment on pain.  This information provides a foundation for future research on the influence of multi-sensory nature in outdoor environments on OA pain.
Keywords:
Women; Osteoarthritis; Pain symptoms; Pain management
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5559
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePAIN OF OSTEOARTHRITIS IN WOMEN: ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH (PHASE I)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211594-
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of this study is to describe pain symptom experiences of women with osteoarthritis (OA) in outdoor environments. Rationale:  Symptom Management Theory (SMT; originally called the Symptom Management Model; Dodd et al., 2001), includes the physical environment as a factor that may influence pain.  Outdoor environments may contribute to pain management through multiple mechanisms, including distraction by means of engaging and fascinating multisensory stimuli of nature. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study uses qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of 16 women, 65 years and older, with OA pain.  Participants live in independent apartments at one of four retirement community sites. These sites were selected, from among 13 sites evaluated, for specific outdoor environment characteristics.  Each site has two outdoor spaces (e.g., a courtyard) with different levels (one higher and one lower) of multi-sensory nature, measured objectively using the Access to Nature Outdoor Environment Tool-Revised.  In-depth individual interviews were held with women about their pain experiences and how they respond in these particular outdoor spaces.   The interviews are being transcribed verbatim, with person and place de-identified, and transcripts are verified for accuracy.  Transcripts will be analyzed through directed content analysis, using SMT concepts and looking for patterns in ways the outdoor spaces with different levels of multi-sensory nature might affect OA pain.  Two methodological experts in content analysis, from nursing and environmental psychology, will provide consensual validation of the coding and assure trustworthiness of the qualitative data. Results:  Field notes and methodological memos are informing the content analysis.  The 16 women interviewed range in age from 70 to 92.  All of the women reported OA pain during the previous week, ranging from 3 to 10 (on a scale of 0 to 10).  Fourteen of the women reported experiencing pain on most days in the previous week.  The women discussed their OA pain, pain management, and their pain experiences when outdoors generally and in the identified spaces. Implications:  The findings will be used in the development of a SMT model relevant for older women with OA in regard to pain symptom experiences and outdoor environments.  Increased understanding of how older women with OA pain use and experience different outdoor environments will provide important insights about the influence of environment on pain.  This information provides a foundation for future research on the influence of multi-sensory nature in outdoor environments on OA pain.en_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisen_GB
dc.subjectPain symptomsen_GB
dc.subjectPain managementen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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