2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211596
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SIMULATION AND NURSING STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD POVERTY
Abstract:
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes about poverty and poor people held by nursing students and to explore the impact of a poverty simulation on attitudes of nursing students toward poverty and the poor. This research provides evidence of the efficacy and utility of simulation in the affective domain for nursing students. RATIONALE: In 2009, 43.6 million people in the United States were in poverty, the largest number in the 51 years in which poverty estimates have been published. Negative attitudes and stereotypes can have a negative impact on professional behavior. The literature regarding stereotypes and attitudes toward poor people and poverty held by health care professionals is troubling. Medical students’ knowledge and attitudes toward the poor erode over the course of their medical education (Wear & Kuczewski, 2008). Randall (2009) in a descriptive study with baccalaureate nursing students, found male and 22 years and younger students had less positive attitudes toward poverty. Contrary to an expected positive response, research indicates nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty are neutral (Kovarna, 2006; Sword, Reutter, Meagher-Stewart, & Rideout 2004). Simulation is a pedagogical sound strategy to emulate specific learning environments and to impact cognitive and affective dimensions of learning.  A simulation about poverty provides a stimulating learning opportunity in which nursing students can develop knowledge and feelings about the experiences and challenges of living in poverty. Reflection and discussion of the experiential aspect of simulation further enhances the cognitive and affective knowledge transfer from the simulation to student. METHODS: The research questions that guided this research: 1)What are nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty and the poor? 2) What effect does a Poverty Simulation have on nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty and the poor? 3) What is the relationship between attitudes toward poverty and the poor and demographic variables? The research was a pre-post test intervention design using a convenience sample of 72 undergraduate nursing students in their final year of nursing school. The pre-post data collection instruments included a 10-item demographic survey and a 37-item attitudes toward poverty survey (Atherton & Gemmel, 1993).  The intervention was poverty simulation implemented with 72 nursing students at one time. At the end of the simulation, debriefing began in small groups of 8-10 students in which students were asked to reflect on their experiences, interactions, and feelings throughout the simulation, a summary of which was reported to the large group. Discussions with all of the nursing students focused on small group similarities and differences as well as lessons learned from the simulation experience and opportunities for application to their professional practice. RESULTS: Data collection will be completed December 2011. Data will be analyzed using qualitative and quantitative data analysis strategies. OUTCOMES: This research will add to the body of knowledge about the efficacy of group simulation to foster nursing student awareness and  knowledge about poverty and poor people and to nurture skills and behaviors that reflect respect and caring for all health care clients.
Keywords:
Nursing students attitudes; Poverty; Poor
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5560
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSIMULATION AND NURSING STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD POVERTYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211596-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes about poverty and poor people held by nursing students and to explore the impact of a poverty simulation on attitudes of nursing students toward poverty and the poor. This research provides evidence of the efficacy and utility of simulation in the affective domain for nursing students. RATIONALE: In 2009, 43.6 million people in the United States were in poverty, the largest number in the 51 years in which poverty estimates have been published. Negative attitudes and stereotypes can have a negative impact on professional behavior. The literature regarding stereotypes and attitudes toward poor people and poverty held by health care professionals is troubling. Medical students’ knowledge and attitudes toward the poor erode over the course of their medical education (Wear & Kuczewski, 2008). Randall (2009) in a descriptive study with baccalaureate nursing students, found male and 22 years and younger students had less positive attitudes toward poverty. Contrary to an expected positive response, research indicates nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty are neutral (Kovarna, 2006; Sword, Reutter, Meagher-Stewart, & Rideout 2004). Simulation is a pedagogical sound strategy to emulate specific learning environments and to impact cognitive and affective dimensions of learning.  A simulation about poverty provides a stimulating learning opportunity in which nursing students can develop knowledge and feelings about the experiences and challenges of living in poverty. Reflection and discussion of the experiential aspect of simulation further enhances the cognitive and affective knowledge transfer from the simulation to student. METHODS: The research questions that guided this research: 1)What are nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty and the poor? 2) What effect does a Poverty Simulation have on nursing students’ attitudes toward poverty and the poor? 3) What is the relationship between attitudes toward poverty and the poor and demographic variables? The research was a pre-post test intervention design using a convenience sample of 72 undergraduate nursing students in their final year of nursing school. The pre-post data collection instruments included a 10-item demographic survey and a 37-item attitudes toward poverty survey (Atherton & Gemmel, 1993).  The intervention was poverty simulation implemented with 72 nursing students at one time. At the end of the simulation, debriefing began in small groups of 8-10 students in which students were asked to reflect on their experiences, interactions, and feelings throughout the simulation, a summary of which was reported to the large group. Discussions with all of the nursing students focused on small group similarities and differences as well as lessons learned from the simulation experience and opportunities for application to their professional practice. RESULTS: Data collection will be completed December 2011. Data will be analyzed using qualitative and quantitative data analysis strategies. OUTCOMES: This research will add to the body of knowledge about the efficacy of group simulation to foster nursing student awareness and  knowledge about poverty and poor people and to nurture skills and behaviors that reflect respect and caring for all health care clients.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing students attitudesen_GB
dc.subjectPovertyen_GB
dc.subjectPooren_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:19Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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