USING COMPUTER-BASED, POINT-OF-CARE DRAWINGS TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S PAIN EXPERIENCES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211599
Type:
Research Study
Title:
USING COMPUTER-BASED, POINT-OF-CARE DRAWINGS TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S PAIN EXPERIENCES
Abstract:
Background: While the development of point-of-care (POC) documentation has improved many aspects of patient care, including patient safety, it has unfortunately resulted in reductions in both verbal and visual interactions between providers and patients. There is a need for POC documentation mechanisms that instead sustain and/or enhance nurse/patient interactions. Nowhere is this more important than in interactions with children, where communication is often already a challenge. Purpose: Children with chronic headaches were selected as a prototype population to explore using a novel, computer-based drawing application developed to enhance POC communication of children’s pain experiences. Headache was selected as it is the most common and one of the most disabling types of chronic pain in childhood, affecting 60.5% of children. Methods: This was an exploratory pilot using a modified cooperative inquiry approach. 20 children, 7-12 years of age with chronic primary headaches (e.g. migraines, tension-type) were recruited through two pediatric neurology clinics. Each child participated in a1:1 interactive interview about their headache pain experience using a ‘zoomable’ drawing application on a Dell XT2 tablet with multi-touch display and attached digital pen. Each session was videotaped and screen recording software (Camtasia©) was used to capture the drawing process. Data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and content analysis. Results/Findings: Children’s drawings and accompanying narratives were clear and focused. Children described very specific patterns of headache pain, including the location, primary and secondary symptom descriptors, and actions/behaviors that accompanied their headaches (e.g. placing an ice pack, lying down). The number of descriptors ranged from 7-19, with a median of 12. The ability to ‘zoom’ in/out using their fingers, offered children with the opportunity to provide additional details as well as context. The median time for completion was 5 minutes. Discussion/Implications: Using a novel, computer-based drawing application, children to provided rich descriptions of their headache experiences, without any hesitation. The time it took would fit into a regular visit. Further, the format for these POC drawings and/or screen/voice recordings is able to be stored as electronic medical record files.
Keywords:
Point of care; Nurse patient interactions
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5565
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleUSING COMPUTER-BASED, POINT-OF-CARE DRAWINGS TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S PAIN EXPERIENCESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211599-
dc.description.abstractBackground: While the development of point-of-care (POC) documentation has improved many aspects of patient care, including patient safety, it has unfortunately resulted in reductions in both verbal and visual interactions between providers and patients. There is a need for POC documentation mechanisms that instead sustain and/or enhance nurse/patient interactions. Nowhere is this more important than in interactions with children, where communication is often already a challenge. Purpose: Children with chronic headaches were selected as a prototype population to explore using a novel, computer-based drawing application developed to enhance POC communication of children’s pain experiences. Headache was selected as it is the most common and one of the most disabling types of chronic pain in childhood, affecting 60.5% of children. Methods: This was an exploratory pilot using a modified cooperative inquiry approach. 20 children, 7-12 years of age with chronic primary headaches (e.g. migraines, tension-type) were recruited through two pediatric neurology clinics. Each child participated in a1:1 interactive interview about their headache pain experience using a ‘zoomable’ drawing application on a Dell XT2 tablet with multi-touch display and attached digital pen. Each session was videotaped and screen recording software (Camtasia©) was used to capture the drawing process. Data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and content analysis. Results/Findings: Children’s drawings and accompanying narratives were clear and focused. Children described very specific patterns of headache pain, including the location, primary and secondary symptom descriptors, and actions/behaviors that accompanied their headaches (e.g. placing an ice pack, lying down). The number of descriptors ranged from 7-19, with a median of 12. The ability to ‘zoom’ in/out using their fingers, offered children with the opportunity to provide additional details as well as context. The median time for completion was 5 minutes. Discussion/Implications: Using a novel, computer-based drawing application, children to provided rich descriptions of their headache experiences, without any hesitation. The time it took would fit into a regular visit. Further, the format for these POC drawings and/or screen/voice recordings is able to be stored as electronic medical record files.en_GB
dc.subjectPoint of careen_GB
dc.subjectNurse patient interactionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:29Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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