A COMMUNITY-BASED COLLABORATIVE ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT WITH SUDANESE REFUGEE WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211600
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A COMMUNITY-BASED COLLABORATIVE ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT WITH SUDANESE REFUGEE WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: To partner with a community of Sudanese refugee women to address their health concerns. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/Background: Resettled refugees face multiple challenges as they learn to adapt to new socio-cultural and healthcare systems. The theory of Well-being in Cultural Transition (anonymous) provided a framework for an intervention project between researchers from a large academic medical center and a Sudanese refugee community to address their health needs. Methods: A Community-based Collaborative Action Research (CBCAR) design was used to develop a list of community health-related concerns and deliver monthly educational seminars. The seminars were held at the Sudanese Community Church and interpreted into Dinka and Arabic. Seminar topics included: preventative well-women’s health; sexually transmitted diseases; childhood illnesses; parenting skills; and women’s psychological stress. Following each seminar audio-taped focus groups were conducted to gain the perspectives of the refugee women. The transcribed and back-translated focus groups were analyzed using qualitative methods. Recurring patterns and themes were confirmed with participants and an action plan was developed for the community. Findings: Eighteen women participated in the five educational seminars and focus groups. Findings reveal that the refugee women lacked understanding about preventative health practices such as mammograms and the need to take vitamins. Barriers to access healthcare included a lack of time with healthcare providers, no health insurance and an inability to afford co-pays and prescribed medications. Some of the women also experienced discrimination by US health care providers. Implications: Community-based collaborative action research is a culturally appropriate method to partner with marginalized populations such as refugees to address their health needs in resettlement. The partnership that resulted from this project is ongoing and will contribute to sustainable change to address the complex health care needs of a refugee community.
Keywords:
Sudanese refugees; Women; Health concerns
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5568
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA COMMUNITY-BASED COLLABORATIVE ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT WITH SUDANESE REFUGEE WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211600-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: To partner with a community of Sudanese refugee women to address their health concerns. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/Background: Resettled refugees face multiple challenges as they learn to adapt to new socio-cultural and healthcare systems. The theory of Well-being in Cultural Transition (anonymous) provided a framework for an intervention project between researchers from a large academic medical center and a Sudanese refugee community to address their health needs. Methods: A Community-based Collaborative Action Research (CBCAR) design was used to develop a list of community health-related concerns and deliver monthly educational seminars. The seminars were held at the Sudanese Community Church and interpreted into Dinka and Arabic. Seminar topics included: preventative well-women’s health; sexually transmitted diseases; childhood illnesses; parenting skills; and women’s psychological stress. Following each seminar audio-taped focus groups were conducted to gain the perspectives of the refugee women. The transcribed and back-translated focus groups were analyzed using qualitative methods. Recurring patterns and themes were confirmed with participants and an action plan was developed for the community. Findings: Eighteen women participated in the five educational seminars and focus groups. Findings reveal that the refugee women lacked understanding about preventative health practices such as mammograms and the need to take vitamins. Barriers to access healthcare included a lack of time with healthcare providers, no health insurance and an inability to afford co-pays and prescribed medications. Some of the women also experienced discrimination by US health care providers. Implications: Community-based collaborative action research is a culturally appropriate method to partner with marginalized populations such as refugees to address their health needs in resettlement. The partnership that resulted from this project is ongoing and will contribute to sustainable change to address the complex health care needs of a refugee community.en_GB
dc.subjectSudanese refugeesen_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.subjectHealth concernsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:33Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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