2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211601
Type:
Research Study
Title:
STIGMA IN WOMEN LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS IN INDONESIA
Abstract:
Background: With continued high rates of incidence, Indonesia is now ranked as the fastest growing HIV epidemic in Asia. There is an estimated 333,200 people living with HIV in Indonesia of which 25% are women. While the numbers of men living with HIV are greater than that of women, the social impacts faced by women are far worse due to gender inequity. Few studies have examined HIV-related stigma in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Indonesia. Purpose: To understand the lived experiences of stigma among women living with HIV in Indonesia. Method: Data was collected from 20 WLWH at the Pelita Ilmu Foundation office using semi-structured in-depth interviews. The first interviews were conducted over 60 – 90 minutes and 30 minutes for a second interview with 6 selected participants from the original twenty.  Interviews were recorded using a digital audio recorder and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to assess the lived experiences of stigma among the participants. Results: Most of the participants were infected by their husband and despite this fact they are continuously faced with being associated with prostitution and free sex. Many women experienced stigma from their own family as they were the first people to whom they disclosed their HIV status. Avoidance, ostracism, and verbal insults were frequently experienced by WLWH. They also experienced enacted stigma from the community and health care providers. Fear of HIV infection and a lack of knowledge about the way HIV is transmitted are common instigators of enacted stigma. Implication: These results highlight the importance of health education about HIV targeted not only for families of WLWH, but also community members and health care providers. Future research should address effective interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma in WLWH.
Keywords:
HIV; Asia; Social impact; Women
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5569
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSTIGMA IN WOMEN LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS IN INDONESIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211601-
dc.description.abstractBackground: With continued high rates of incidence, Indonesia is now ranked as the fastest growing HIV epidemic in Asia. There is an estimated 333,200 people living with HIV in Indonesia of which 25% are women. While the numbers of men living with HIV are greater than that of women, the social impacts faced by women are far worse due to gender inequity. Few studies have examined HIV-related stigma in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Indonesia. Purpose: To understand the lived experiences of stigma among women living with HIV in Indonesia. Method: Data was collected from 20 WLWH at the Pelita Ilmu Foundation office using semi-structured in-depth interviews. The first interviews were conducted over 60 – 90 minutes and 30 minutes for a second interview with 6 selected participants from the original twenty.  Interviews were recorded using a digital audio recorder and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to assess the lived experiences of stigma among the participants. Results: Most of the participants were infected by their husband and despite this fact they are continuously faced with being associated with prostitution and free sex. Many women experienced stigma from their own family as they were the first people to whom they disclosed their HIV status. Avoidance, ostracism, and verbal insults were frequently experienced by WLWH. They also experienced enacted stigma from the community and health care providers. Fear of HIV infection and a lack of knowledge about the way HIV is transmitted are common instigators of enacted stigma. Implication: These results highlight the importance of health education about HIV targeted not only for families of WLWH, but also community members and health care providers. Future research should address effective interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma in WLWH.en_GB
dc.subjectHIVen_GB
dc.subjectAsiaen_GB
dc.subjectSocial impacten_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:36Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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