MENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS TREATED BY TRADITIONAL EAST ASIAN MEDICINE – TWO CASE STUDIES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211602
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS TREATED BY TRADITIONAL EAST ASIAN MEDICINE – TWO CASE STUDIES
Abstract:
Purpose: Although the treatment of symptoms during the menopausal transition (MT) by acupuncture has been studied, to date no study has reflected Traditional East Asian Medicine (TEAM) as it is generally practiced in the USA today. This multiple case study aims to demonstrate two common TEAM approaches to the treatment of symptoms during the menopausal transition. Background: TEAM has been used to treat symptoms related to the MT for millennia and is comprised of many tools including acupuncture, Chinese Herbal medicine (CHM), cupping and tui na massage. This project presents the outcomes of two case studies of women experiencing MT symptoms. Both were successfully treated: one with acupuncture only, the other with CHM and acupuncture. Methods: Signed, informed consent was obtained from both patients. A retrospective chart review was performed using content analysis. Patients verbally reported during the TEAM appointment and notes were taken regarding intensity, frequency, perceived percentage change and bother of HFs and other related symptoms (sleep, mood, pain, cognition). Both patients received weekly acupuncture for one month, after which they have received bi-weekly acupuncture for six months. Patient B has taken CHM in granular form twice daily for seven months. The formula was modified over time according to her presentation. Outcomes: Patient A experienced hot flashes (HFs) at night and anxiety. She was diagnosed with Kidney Yin deficiency and Heart Qi instability. Acupuncture points were chosen according to this diagnosis. She stated that her symptoms improved by 50% after one month and were improved by 90% after two months. Her HFs were completely gone by month three and her anxiety was “basically gone” by month three. Patient B experienced HFs and joint pain and received acupuncture and CHM. She was diagnosed with Kidney Yin and Yang imbalance. HF frequency and intensity reduced 90% and joint pain reduced 20% after one month. HFs reduced 100% at month two and for the duration of the study. Joint pain improved by 50% with seven months’ treatment. Conclusions: Patients A and B both experienced significant and lasting benefit from acupuncture and CHM for the treatment of their MT symptoms. This project highlights the importance of individualized care, rendered after a TEAM diagnosis has been determined. While some research has been conducted on the treatment of MT symptoms with acupuncture, little has been done with individualized care according to TEAM principles and no study to date has offered variable treatment modalities (acupuncture, CHM, etc) as they change over time according to each case. Future prospective studies of MT symptoms treated with TEAM need to be evaluated with standardized measures such as the Kupperman’s Index, Greene Climacteric Scale and self-report journals.  Additionally, a study design with the emergent, changing and individualized nature of TEAM care would reflect TEAM as it is currently practiced in clinics in the USA.
Keywords:
Menopausal transition; Menopause symptoms; Acupuncture
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5570
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS TREATED BY TRADITIONAL EAST ASIAN MEDICINE – TWO CASE STUDIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211602-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although the treatment of symptoms during the menopausal transition (MT) by acupuncture has been studied, to date no study has reflected Traditional East Asian Medicine (TEAM) as it is generally practiced in the USA today. This multiple case study aims to demonstrate two common TEAM approaches to the treatment of symptoms during the menopausal transition. Background: TEAM has been used to treat symptoms related to the MT for millennia and is comprised of many tools including acupuncture, Chinese Herbal medicine (CHM), cupping and tui na massage. This project presents the outcomes of two case studies of women experiencing MT symptoms. Both were successfully treated: one with acupuncture only, the other with CHM and acupuncture. Methods: Signed, informed consent was obtained from both patients. A retrospective chart review was performed using content analysis. Patients verbally reported during the TEAM appointment and notes were taken regarding intensity, frequency, perceived percentage change and bother of HFs and other related symptoms (sleep, mood, pain, cognition). Both patients received weekly acupuncture for one month, after which they have received bi-weekly acupuncture for six months. Patient B has taken CHM in granular form twice daily for seven months. The formula was modified over time according to her presentation. Outcomes: Patient A experienced hot flashes (HFs) at night and anxiety. She was diagnosed with Kidney Yin deficiency and Heart Qi instability. Acupuncture points were chosen according to this diagnosis. She stated that her symptoms improved by 50% after one month and were improved by 90% after two months. Her HFs were completely gone by month three and her anxiety was “basically gone” by month three. Patient B experienced HFs and joint pain and received acupuncture and CHM. She was diagnosed with Kidney Yin and Yang imbalance. HF frequency and intensity reduced 90% and joint pain reduced 20% after one month. HFs reduced 100% at month two and for the duration of the study. Joint pain improved by 50% with seven months’ treatment. Conclusions: Patients A and B both experienced significant and lasting benefit from acupuncture and CHM for the treatment of their MT symptoms. This project highlights the importance of individualized care, rendered after a TEAM diagnosis has been determined. While some research has been conducted on the treatment of MT symptoms with acupuncture, little has been done with individualized care according to TEAM principles and no study to date has offered variable treatment modalities (acupuncture, CHM, etc) as they change over time according to each case. Future prospective studies of MT symptoms treated with TEAM need to be evaluated with standardized measures such as the Kupperman’s Index, Greene Climacteric Scale and self-report journals.  Additionally, a study design with the emergent, changing and individualized nature of TEAM care would reflect TEAM as it is currently practiced in clinics in the USA.en_GB
dc.subjectMenopausal transitionen_GB
dc.subjectMenopause symptomsen_GB
dc.subjectAcupunctureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:39Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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