CORRELATES AMONG HEADACHE FREQUENCY AND DISABILITY AND MENTAL HEALTH in ADOLESCENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211604
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CORRELATES AMONG HEADACHE FREQUENCY AND DISABILITY AND MENTAL HEALTH in ADOLESCENTS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between headache frequency, disability, and comorbid conditions such as depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, and disruptive behaviors in high school students, and correlate with lifestyle beliefs and demographic factors. Background and Significance: Chronic daily headaches (CDH) cause significant morbidity (increased suicide risk and depressive and anxiety disorders) and occur in 2.4% of the adolescent population.  There are limited studies that have examined correlates among headache frequency, headache disability, depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, disruptive behavior, and lifestyle beliefs in adolescents with chronic headaches. Method: A descriptive correlation study was conducted with 493 high school teens. Key variables measured included depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, disruptive behavior, headache frequency and disability, and lifestyle beliefs. Students were recruited from high schools in the Southwest United States. Results: Significant positive correlations were found among headache frequency, headache disability, depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, and disruptive behavior.  A significant negative correlation existed among these variables and self-concept and beliefs. Beliefs were positively correlated with self-concept.  This study demonstrated that as cognitive beliefs about healthy lifestyles increase so does the adolescents’ self-concept, while the level of anxiety, anger, depressive symptoms, and disruptive behavior decreases.  Finally, as headache frequency and disability increases, so does the level of depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, and disruptive behavior. The adolescents’ self-concept decreases with increase frequency and disability of headaches and headache disability increases with increased headache frequency. Implications: The findings from this study support the use of strategies to strengthen teens’ beliefs about their ability to manage their headaches.  It is vital that clinicians working with teens with headaches learn cognitive behavioral skills building strategies to include problem solving skills, relaxation techniques, positive self-talk, goal setting, and recognition of behavioral cues of ineffective coping in order to teach teens how to regulate their responses to everyday stressor and promote problem-focused behaviors.  By incorporating healthy headache lifestyle behaviors into their teaching, clinicians can help adolescents see how their thoughts about their headaches are impacted by their emotions and beliefs.  In addition, findings from this study will inform a doctoral study that will examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of implementing a cognitive skills building intervention for teens with chronic daily headaches.  The results from this dissertation study may provide evidence to fill a much-needed gap for theory-based interventions that are effective for teens with chronic headaches.
Keywords:
Headaches; High School students
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5580
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCORRELATES AMONG HEADACHE FREQUENCY AND DISABILITY AND MENTAL HEALTH in ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211604-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between headache frequency, disability, and comorbid conditions such as depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, and disruptive behaviors in high school students, and correlate with lifestyle beliefs and demographic factors. Background and Significance: Chronic daily headaches (CDH) cause significant morbidity (increased suicide risk and depressive and anxiety disorders) and occur in 2.4% of the adolescent population.  There are limited studies that have examined correlates among headache frequency, headache disability, depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, disruptive behavior, and lifestyle beliefs in adolescents with chronic headaches. Method: A descriptive correlation study was conducted with 493 high school teens. Key variables measured included depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, self-concept, disruptive behavior, headache frequency and disability, and lifestyle beliefs. Students were recruited from high schools in the Southwest United States. Results: Significant positive correlations were found among headache frequency, headache disability, depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, and disruptive behavior.  A significant negative correlation existed among these variables and self-concept and beliefs. Beliefs were positively correlated with self-concept.  This study demonstrated that as cognitive beliefs about healthy lifestyles increase so does the adolescents’ self-concept, while the level of anxiety, anger, depressive symptoms, and disruptive behavior decreases.  Finally, as headache frequency and disability increases, so does the level of depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, and disruptive behavior. The adolescents’ self-concept decreases with increase frequency and disability of headaches and headache disability increases with increased headache frequency. Implications: The findings from this study support the use of strategies to strengthen teens’ beliefs about their ability to manage their headaches.  It is vital that clinicians working with teens with headaches learn cognitive behavioral skills building strategies to include problem solving skills, relaxation techniques, positive self-talk, goal setting, and recognition of behavioral cues of ineffective coping in order to teach teens how to regulate their responses to everyday stressor and promote problem-focused behaviors.  By incorporating healthy headache lifestyle behaviors into their teaching, clinicians can help adolescents see how their thoughts about their headaches are impacted by their emotions and beliefs.  In addition, findings from this study will inform a doctoral study that will examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of implementing a cognitive skills building intervention for teens with chronic daily headaches.  The results from this dissertation study may provide evidence to fill a much-needed gap for theory-based interventions that are effective for teens with chronic headaches.en_GB
dc.subjectHeadachesen_GB
dc.subjectHigh School studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:46Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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