2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211605
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SEXUAL BEHAVIORS IN ASIAN AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER YOUNG ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose: This study examined Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) young adults’ sexual behaviors and factors associated with these behaviors. Background: Sexual behaviors in young adults have become a global health concern because of the negative consequences of risky sexual behaviors including HIV/STI, unplanned pregnancies, and their associated social costs. About a quarter of AAPI college students reported a lifetime prevalence of unprotected sex and about 95% of those who engaged in anal sex did so without using condoms. Despite these alarming statistics, studies to address sexual health among AAPI youth and young adults are rarely conducted. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional internet survey targeting AAPI young adults aged 18-35 years between February and June, 2011. Participants were recruited via randomly selected students’ emails from the University Office of Evaluation and Educational Effectiveness, and advertisements through student organizations and on Facebook. Students who met the criteria and completed informed consent filled out an online anonymous survey at their own pace, with reentry privileges. Participants received an automatic recognition message after completing the survey, and receive a $10 e-certificate. Existing valid and reliable measures were adapted to measure AAPI young adults’ sexual and condom use behaviors and factors associated with these behaviors. Results: The sample included 50 undergraduates (mean age = 21.6 (SD=1.8), 60% male, 62% sexually active) and 60 graduate students (mean age = 27.9 (SD=3.5), 55% male, 82% sexually active). Among those who were sexually active, 19% reported having 5 or more steady sexual partners during life time; 60% had one steady sexual partner during the past 30 days, and 17% had sexual intercourse while high on drugs or alcohol. More than half (52%) of the sexually active students have had casual sexual partners during their lifetime and 11% reported having casual sexual partners in the past 30 days. Regarding condom use with steady partners, 33% of the students did not use condoms; 8% did not use condoms while having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Of the 9 students who have had sex with casual sexual partners in the past 30 days, 33% reported no condom use during sex. In regression analyses, controlling for age, gender and parental education, students who had more favorable attitudes toward sex (B = .75) and were more acculturated (B = .98) reported more steady sexual partners during their lifetime. Controlling for age and gender, sexually active students who self-identified as sexual minority (Bisexual: n = 8, Homosexual: n = 8) reported, on average 4 more lifetime sexual partners (t = 3.26, p = .002) than did heterosexual students. Implications: The findings suggest that it is not uncommon for AAPI young adults to engage in risky sexual behaviors (e.g., having sex with casual partners, having sex without condoms or under influence of substances). It is imperative for healthcare providers to constantly assess sexual behaviors and substance use in this population and provide appropriate health education.    
Keywords:
Asian American; Pacific Islander; Young adults; Sexual behaviors
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5581
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSEXUAL BEHAVIORS IN ASIAN AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER YOUNG ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211605-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) young adults’ sexual behaviors and factors associated with these behaviors. Background: Sexual behaviors in young adults have become a global health concern because of the negative consequences of risky sexual behaviors including HIV/STI, unplanned pregnancies, and their associated social costs. About a quarter of AAPI college students reported a lifetime prevalence of unprotected sex and about 95% of those who engaged in anal sex did so without using condoms. Despite these alarming statistics, studies to address sexual health among AAPI youth and young adults are rarely conducted. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional internet survey targeting AAPI young adults aged 18-35 years between February and June, 2011. Participants were recruited via randomly selected students’ emails from the University Office of Evaluation and Educational Effectiveness, and advertisements through student organizations and on Facebook. Students who met the criteria and completed informed consent filled out an online anonymous survey at their own pace, with reentry privileges. Participants received an automatic recognition message after completing the survey, and receive a $10 e-certificate. Existing valid and reliable measures were adapted to measure AAPI young adults’ sexual and condom use behaviors and factors associated with these behaviors. Results: The sample included 50 undergraduates (mean age = 21.6 (SD=1.8), 60% male, 62% sexually active) and 60 graduate students (mean age = 27.9 (SD=3.5), 55% male, 82% sexually active). Among those who were sexually active, 19% reported having 5 or more steady sexual partners during life time; 60% had one steady sexual partner during the past 30 days, and 17% had sexual intercourse while high on drugs or alcohol. More than half (52%) of the sexually active students have had casual sexual partners during their lifetime and 11% reported having casual sexual partners in the past 30 days. Regarding condom use with steady partners, 33% of the students did not use condoms; 8% did not use condoms while having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Of the 9 students who have had sex with casual sexual partners in the past 30 days, 33% reported no condom use during sex. In regression analyses, controlling for age, gender and parental education, students who had more favorable attitudes toward sex (B = .75) and were more acculturated (B = .98) reported more steady sexual partners during their lifetime. Controlling for age and gender, sexually active students who self-identified as sexual minority (Bisexual: n = 8, Homosexual: n = 8) reported, on average 4 more lifetime sexual partners (t = 3.26, p = .002) than did heterosexual students. Implications: The findings suggest that it is not uncommon for AAPI young adults to engage in risky sexual behaviors (e.g., having sex with casual partners, having sex without condoms or under influence of substances). It is imperative for healthcare providers to constantly assess sexual behaviors and substance use in this population and provide appropriate health education.    en_GB
dc.subjectAsian Americanen_GB
dc.subjectPacific Islanderen_GB
dc.subjectYoung adultsen_GB
dc.subjectSexual behaviorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:49Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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