2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211606
Type:
Research Study
Title:
HEALTH PROMOTION AND RELATED PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN MEXICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to identify predictors associated with health-promoting lifestyle behaviors in Mexican-American women. Study aims investigated the relationships of four predictor variables on health promotion and the degree of influence of those variables: CHD knowledge, perceived health status, acculturation level, and menopausal status. Background: In Mexican-Americans, the burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with simply being “female,” and is equal, if not greater than that of non-Hispanic whites. Death and disability due to CHD, the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease, is vastly affected by Hispanic healthcare disparities, as manifested by poorer access to care and disproportionate delivery of medical treatments to underrepresented groups and also between men and women.  Yet, a health-promoting lifestyle can largely reduce cardiovascular risk and/or delay disease progression, and lessen disparate healthcare. Methods: A descriptive quantitative study design was used to enroll a sample of 128 adult Mexican-American women free of a CHD diagnosis residing in the Northeastern United States (US).  A cross-sectional survey methodology using four Spanish-language instruments explored the relationships between CHD knowledge, perceived health status, acculturation level, menopausal status and health promotion. Results: The sample consisted of a relatively young group of Mexican-American women who preferred to speak Spanish, regardless of birth country, length of US residency, or acculturation level. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between perceived health status and health promotion (r = .495, p = .001) and also with CHD knowledge levels (r = .305, p = .001).  After adjustments, only perceived health status remained statistically significant (b = .112, 95% CI = .058 - .165, p < .001).  These women perceived they could influence present health status, but only when it became necessary, while maintaining a positive outlook of future health.  Three key demographic variables, also statistically significant, showed increased age supported healthier lifestyles (b=.009, p = .050), whereas having less than five years of formal schooling diluted perceptions of health promotion (b=-.327, p = .038), and literacy level showed reading comprehension ability improved health knowledge levels (b=-.373, p = 0.002). Implications: Study findings extended what is known about cardiovascular health promotion in underrepresented ethnic groups. An enhanced understanding can foster future research to develop culturally-tailored and sex-specific interventions to promote heart-healthy lifestyles among Latinas, particularly Mexican-Americans, and effectively eliminate health disparities in this growing cohort of women.  
Keywords:
Mexican American women; Health promoting lifestyle behaviors
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5585
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleHEALTH PROMOTION AND RELATED PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN MEXICAN-AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211606-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research study was to identify predictors associated with health-promoting lifestyle behaviors in Mexican-American women. Study aims investigated the relationships of four predictor variables on health promotion and the degree of influence of those variables: CHD knowledge, perceived health status, acculturation level, and menopausal status. Background: In Mexican-Americans, the burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with simply being “female,” and is equal, if not greater than that of non-Hispanic whites. Death and disability due to CHD, the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease, is vastly affected by Hispanic healthcare disparities, as manifested by poorer access to care and disproportionate delivery of medical treatments to underrepresented groups and also between men and women.  Yet, a health-promoting lifestyle can largely reduce cardiovascular risk and/or delay disease progression, and lessen disparate healthcare. Methods: A descriptive quantitative study design was used to enroll a sample of 128 adult Mexican-American women free of a CHD diagnosis residing in the Northeastern United States (US).  A cross-sectional survey methodology using four Spanish-language instruments explored the relationships between CHD knowledge, perceived health status, acculturation level, menopausal status and health promotion. Results: The sample consisted of a relatively young group of Mexican-American women who preferred to speak Spanish, regardless of birth country, length of US residency, or acculturation level. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between perceived health status and health promotion (r = .495, p = .001) and also with CHD knowledge levels (r = .305, p = .001).  After adjustments, only perceived health status remained statistically significant (b = .112, 95% CI = .058 - .165, p < .001).  These women perceived they could influence present health status, but only when it became necessary, while maintaining a positive outlook of future health.  Three key demographic variables, also statistically significant, showed increased age supported healthier lifestyles (b=.009, p = .050), whereas having less than five years of formal schooling diluted perceptions of health promotion (b=-.327, p = .038), and literacy level showed reading comprehension ability improved health knowledge levels (b=-.373, p = 0.002). Implications: Study findings extended what is known about cardiovascular health promotion in underrepresented ethnic groups. An enhanced understanding can foster future research to develop culturally-tailored and sex-specific interventions to promote heart-healthy lifestyles among Latinas, particularly Mexican-Americans, and effectively eliminate health disparities in this growing cohort of women.  en_GB
dc.subjectMexican American womenen_GB
dc.subjectHealth promoting lifestyle behaviorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:04:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:04:53Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:04:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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