2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211631
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BLACK FAMILY CAREGIVER MANAGEMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMS IN DEMENTIA
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify the strategies Black family caregivers used to manage their care-recipients’ behavioral symptoms of dementia.  This is a secondary analysis of interviews with Black family caregivers. Earlier research (by one of the authors) on strategies used by White caregivers identified eleven typical interventions.  In this secondary analysis, we expect to find that Black family caregivers employed strategies similar to those used by White family caregivers.  Furthermore, we expect to identify new strategies that would help explain how Black family caregivers manage challenging behaviors in their family members with dementia. Background:  The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States is rapidly growing.  In lockstep with this growth is the increased demand on families to provide care to those with dementia.  In order to cultivate both personal satisfaction for caregivers and successful management of the aging population in our society, it is essential to identify and use strategies that foster successful adaptation to the caregiving role.  Studies on ethnic differences in caregiving suggest that that Black caregivers fare better in the caregiving role as indicated by lower depression scores and better life satisfaction than White caregivers.  What can be learned from Black family caregivers about effective stress and burden management when caring for a person with dementia? Method:  18 Black family caregivers living in Wisconsin were interviewed in the early 1990s.  They were asked about how they managed the behavior symptoms of dementia in their care recipients.  This current study uses latent pattern content analysis to identify patterns of intervention types used by these caregivers. Results:  Preliminary findings suggest that these Black family caregivers employed similar management techniques for managing the behavioral symptoms of dementia as White caregivers.    Common approaches to managing behaviors included using “convincing” (attempts to change what the care receiver thinks), “going along” (caregiver does not try to change behavior) and “help-seeking” (employing family or formal services for help).   Unique approaches used by the family caregivers in this study included “ignoring” and “risk management.”  Both tactics seemed to provide care-recipients the ability to engage in behaviors without constant interception on the part of the caregivers.  Examples included allowing a family member to smoke a limited number of cigarettes with supervision (“risk management”) and allowing a care-recipient to engage in preservative activities (e.g. repeating statements) without interference (“ignoring”). Implications:  This study adds to the current understanding of how families manage behavioral symptoms of dementia.  In order to address the needs of millions of caregivers of persons with dementia, effective interventions for behavioral symptoms are needed.  Identifying the strategies Black family caregivers use could inform the development of interventions that foster healthy family caregiver adaptation to the caregiving role.
Keywords:
Dementia; Black family caregivers; Symptom management; Intervention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5592
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBLACK FAMILY CAREGIVER MANAGEMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMS IN DEMENTIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211631-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to identify the strategies Black family caregivers used to manage their care-recipients’ behavioral symptoms of dementia.  This is a secondary analysis of interviews with Black family caregivers. Earlier research (by one of the authors) on strategies used by White caregivers identified eleven typical interventions.  In this secondary analysis, we expect to find that Black family caregivers employed strategies similar to those used by White family caregivers.  Furthermore, we expect to identify new strategies that would help explain how Black family caregivers manage challenging behaviors in their family members with dementia. Background:  The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States is rapidly growing.  In lockstep with this growth is the increased demand on families to provide care to those with dementia.  In order to cultivate both personal satisfaction for caregivers and successful management of the aging population in our society, it is essential to identify and use strategies that foster successful adaptation to the caregiving role.  Studies on ethnic differences in caregiving suggest that that Black caregivers fare better in the caregiving role as indicated by lower depression scores and better life satisfaction than White caregivers.  What can be learned from Black family caregivers about effective stress and burden management when caring for a person with dementia? Method:  18 Black family caregivers living in Wisconsin were interviewed in the early 1990s.  They were asked about how they managed the behavior symptoms of dementia in their care recipients.  This current study uses latent pattern content analysis to identify patterns of intervention types used by these caregivers. Results:  Preliminary findings suggest that these Black family caregivers employed similar management techniques for managing the behavioral symptoms of dementia as White caregivers.    Common approaches to managing behaviors included using “convincing” (attempts to change what the care receiver thinks), “going along” (caregiver does not try to change behavior) and “help-seeking” (employing family or formal services for help).   Unique approaches used by the family caregivers in this study included “ignoring” and “risk management.”  Both tactics seemed to provide care-recipients the ability to engage in behaviors without constant interception on the part of the caregivers.  Examples included allowing a family member to smoke a limited number of cigarettes with supervision (“risk management”) and allowing a care-recipient to engage in preservative activities (e.g. repeating statements) without interference (“ignoring”). Implications:  This study adds to the current understanding of how families manage behavioral symptoms of dementia.  In order to address the needs of millions of caregivers of persons with dementia, effective interventions for behavioral symptoms are needed.  Identifying the strategies Black family caregivers use could inform the development of interventions that foster healthy family caregiver adaptation to the caregiving role.en_GB
dc.subjectDementiaen_GB
dc.subjectBlack family caregiversen_GB
dc.subjectSymptom managementen_GB
dc.subjectInterventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:11Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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