9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211634
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BURNOUT IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLE
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the relationship of family and work balance and other role factors with burnout in nurse educators. Background: The U. S. is projected to have a significant shortage of nurses to meet the demands of a growing healthcare sector (AACN, 2011). One factor contributing to the shortage is stagnant nursing school enrollment that is unable to meet the increasing demands for nursing services, due to faculty shortages across the country. The vacancy rate of nurse educators was estimated to be 6.9% during the 2010-2011 academic year (AACN, 2010). Issues of nursing faculty recruitment and retention have been linked to a limited number of doctoral prepared nurses, higher paying employment in the private sector, high faculty workload, burnout and job dissatisfaction, disinterest in conducting research, and an aging workforce (AACN, 2011; Disch, Edwardson, & Adwan, 2004). Understanding factors related to faculty burnout and dissatisfaction is critical to develop strategies to better recruit and retain nursing faculty.  One of the key factors that may lead to faculty burnout and dissatisfaction is the balance of their work and family roles, which few studies have explored this complex relationship. Methods: A stratified, random sample of approximately 1200 nursing faculty from universities and community colleges throughout the country were approached via email to participate during spring 2009 semester using web-based Surveymonkey.com® software. General demographic and work related information were collected. How well faculty perceived their overall ‘fit’ between their work and family roles was assessed by a 12-item Work and Family Conflict Scale. This scale includes 4 subscales that measure the degree of conflict between the participant’s work and family roles related to either time or strain. Burnout was measured using a modified Shirom–Melamed Burnout Scale. Results: The survey was completed by 287 nursing faculty across the U.S. Using multiple regression analysis, we found that overall burnout was related to work time (p < .05) and strain (p < .001) interfering with family commitments, but not family time and strain interfering with work. However the results varied based on the specific work roles faculty play.  Specifically, we found that burnout was also significantly related to both work time and strain interference with family commitments for faculty that mentor graduate students, have worked in education for more than 10 years, and maintain clinical practice within their academic role. Additionally, faculty with a PhD in nursing reported burnout to not only work time (p < .05) and strain (p < .05) conflict with family obligations, but also family time (p < .05) interference with work, demonstrating the greatest level of burnout when examining at family-work factors. Implications: This study describes some of the complexity in the relationship between work and family role commitments and burnout experienced by nurse faculty.  By understanding the factors leading to burnout in nurse educators, we can better support current faculty and develop models to retain and recruit new faculty to the educator role.
Keywords:
Nurse educators; Burnout; Family work balance
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5608
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBURNOUT IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211634-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the relationship of family and work balance and other role factors with burnout in nurse educators. Background: The U. S. is projected to have a significant shortage of nurses to meet the demands of a growing healthcare sector (AACN, 2011). One factor contributing to the shortage is stagnant nursing school enrollment that is unable to meet the increasing demands for nursing services, due to faculty shortages across the country. The vacancy rate of nurse educators was estimated to be 6.9% during the 2010-2011 academic year (AACN, 2010). Issues of nursing faculty recruitment and retention have been linked to a limited number of doctoral prepared nurses, higher paying employment in the private sector, high faculty workload, burnout and job dissatisfaction, disinterest in conducting research, and an aging workforce (AACN, 2011; Disch, Edwardson, & Adwan, 2004). Understanding factors related to faculty burnout and dissatisfaction is critical to develop strategies to better recruit and retain nursing faculty.  One of the key factors that may lead to faculty burnout and dissatisfaction is the balance of their work and family roles, which few studies have explored this complex relationship. Methods: A stratified, random sample of approximately 1200 nursing faculty from universities and community colleges throughout the country were approached via email to participate during spring 2009 semester using web-based Surveymonkey.com® software. General demographic and work related information were collected. How well faculty perceived their overall ‘fit’ between their work and family roles was assessed by a 12-item Work and Family Conflict Scale. This scale includes 4 subscales that measure the degree of conflict between the participant’s work and family roles related to either time or strain. Burnout was measured using a modified Shirom–Melamed Burnout Scale. Results: The survey was completed by 287 nursing faculty across the U.S. Using multiple regression analysis, we found that overall burnout was related to work time (p < .05) and strain (p < .001) interfering with family commitments, but not family time and strain interfering with work. However the results varied based on the specific work roles faculty play.  Specifically, we found that burnout was also significantly related to both work time and strain interference with family commitments for faculty that mentor graduate students, have worked in education for more than 10 years, and maintain clinical practice within their academic role. Additionally, faculty with a PhD in nursing reported burnout to not only work time (p < .05) and strain (p < .05) conflict with family obligations, but also family time (p < .05) interference with work, demonstrating the greatest level of burnout when examining at family-work factors. Implications: This study describes some of the complexity in the relationship between work and family role commitments and burnout experienced by nurse faculty.  By understanding the factors leading to burnout in nurse educators, we can better support current faculty and develop models to retain and recruit new faculty to the educator role.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse educatorsen_GB
dc.subjectBurnouten_GB
dc.subjectFamily work balanceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:22Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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