2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211635
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FAMILIES OF ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA: A MULTIPLE CASE STUDY
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to present findings of a multiple case study of five families with adolescents with schizophrenia, specifically during the first fifteen months after the onset and to understand who these families are. Background: Schizophrenia is most commonly experienced among young people in their late teens through early 20’s. Early, gradual onset and pervasive, unpredictable symptoms often create confusion within a family. Numerous studies have addressed the needs and experiences of patients with schizophrenia and their families under different names. Despite existing literature, it is relatively less studied what impact the first couple of years after the onset of the illness in the family member has on the life of the family as a unit, not limited to certain concepts or aspects of life nor restricted to certain family members.  Methods: This research study used a multiple-case study method based on secondary data analysis from a two-group longitudinal RCT.  Five families with adolescents with schizophrenia ages between 15 and 19 were selected from the parent study intervention group.  To examine the family’s life in-depth, multiple sources of data were analyzed. Qualitative data from videotapes of 12 2-hour intervention sessions from the RCT for family, parent, teen, and sibling groups were analyzed to identify common themes amongst family members. Quantitative data were obtained from interviews and self-administered questionnaires including structured diagnostic instruments, outcomes measures of coping, family functioning, symptom management, and early signs of symptoms. These data were submitted by family members at 4 different time points and compared for similarities and discrepancies between members and with qualitative data. Results: Families had different structures and composition in terms of parent-child relationship, involvement of relatives and siblings. Parents involved in the study were highly educated and mostly Caucasian except one minority family. Five adolescents experienced the first psychotic break between 15 and 18 years. Two girls with positive family psychiatric history exhibited a bit earlier onset and diagnostic complexity. While three boys displayed levels of functioning similar to the mean of the whole adolescent group, two girls’ scores were distinguishable from the group. Five adolescents experienced prodromal phase and sought professional help within a month after the onset of psychotic symptoms. Three families identified additional stressors within a family, not related to the youth’s illness. Implications: The five families were screened into the parent study because they met the inclusion criteria. The adolescents were in the similar age range and diagnosed with a schizophrenia-spectrum diagnosis. They lived at home with the families at the time of screening and were on regular treatment. At least one adult member participated in the study. Over time, each family grew apart and showed that they were unique in terms of who they were and in the way they experienced schizophrenia. The findings of the study emphasized the importance of recognizing the uniqueness of adolescents with schizophrenia and their families and meeting them where they are to provide effective and individualized care for the families.
Keywords:
Schizophrenia; Adolescents; Family assessment
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5609
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFAMILIES OF ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA: A MULTIPLE CASE STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211635-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this presentation is to present findings of a multiple case study of five families with adolescents with schizophrenia, specifically during the first fifteen months after the onset and to understand who these families are. Background: Schizophrenia is most commonly experienced among young people in their late teens through early 20’s. Early, gradual onset and pervasive, unpredictable symptoms often create confusion within a family. Numerous studies have addressed the needs and experiences of patients with schizophrenia and their families under different names. Despite existing literature, it is relatively less studied what impact the first couple of years after the onset of the illness in the family member has on the life of the family as a unit, not limited to certain concepts or aspects of life nor restricted to certain family members.  Methods: This research study used a multiple-case study method based on secondary data analysis from a two-group longitudinal RCT.  Five families with adolescents with schizophrenia ages between 15 and 19 were selected from the parent study intervention group.  To examine the family’s life in-depth, multiple sources of data were analyzed. Qualitative data from videotapes of 12 2-hour intervention sessions from the RCT for family, parent, teen, and sibling groups were analyzed to identify common themes amongst family members. Quantitative data were obtained from interviews and self-administered questionnaires including structured diagnostic instruments, outcomes measures of coping, family functioning, symptom management, and early signs of symptoms. These data were submitted by family members at 4 different time points and compared for similarities and discrepancies between members and with qualitative data. Results: Families had different structures and composition in terms of parent-child relationship, involvement of relatives and siblings. Parents involved in the study were highly educated and mostly Caucasian except one minority family. Five adolescents experienced the first psychotic break between 15 and 18 years. Two girls with positive family psychiatric history exhibited a bit earlier onset and diagnostic complexity. While three boys displayed levels of functioning similar to the mean of the whole adolescent group, two girls’ scores were distinguishable from the group. Five adolescents experienced prodromal phase and sought professional help within a month after the onset of psychotic symptoms. Three families identified additional stressors within a family, not related to the youth’s illness. Implications: The five families were screened into the parent study because they met the inclusion criteria. The adolescents were in the similar age range and diagnosed with a schizophrenia-spectrum diagnosis. They lived at home with the families at the time of screening and were on regular treatment. At least one adult member participated in the study. Over time, each family grew apart and showed that they were unique in terms of who they were and in the way they experienced schizophrenia. The findings of the study emphasized the importance of recognizing the uniqueness of adolescents with schizophrenia and their families and meeting them where they are to provide effective and individualized care for the families.en_GB
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectFamily assessmenten_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:26Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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