2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211636
Type:
Research Study
Title:
INTENTIONAL PROFESSIONAL FORMATION LEARNING FOR SECOND DEGREE STUDENTS
Abstract:
The recent Carnegie Report called for a radical transformation of nursing education including a critical recommended shift toward professional formation. At the same time, new programs, such as accelerated or second degree programs, have been developed to address the nursing shortage. These 12-18 month programs are proliferating in the U.S. in response to the huge demand. Students are admitted with a minimum of a baccalaureate degree in another field and successful completion of the admission prerequisites. This condensed, intense program, raises concerns for professional formation when there is so much content to learn and apply and so little time to reflect. Second degree students have been described as those with unique learning needs and styles. All students need structural supports and intentional educational strategies to maximize their formation for a smooth transition into practice. Unfortunately, little data exist about effective strategies that promote professional formation, particularly for second degree students. One university program recently introduced formation seminars-- intentional, guided discussions in the first two of five quarters in their program of study. Brief reflections collected at the end of each seminar provided qualitative data for analysis. Findings from the first term of the seminars, on such topics as Professionalism, Ethical Comportment, and Empathy, revealed that students could articulate their thinking about critical aspects of professional formation, such as a growing realization of the 24/7 role of the nurse and an explicit focus on the patient rather than themselves. Additional themes that emerged centered on the value of and communication within the healthcare team and an appreciation for the standards that guide nursing practice. This session will focus on the outcomes from the second term’s professional formation seminars, which included topics such as Professional Practice, Nurse as Teacher, and Teamwork. Early analysis revealed that students are clearly thinking and talking about aspects of professional formation and how it relates to their current practice as well as their future professional practice, suggesting that the learning activities were useful in guiding students’ thinking about their practice as professional nurses.
Keywords:
Nurse education trends; Nursing shortage; Second degree programs
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5610
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleINTENTIONAL PROFESSIONAL FORMATION LEARNING FOR SECOND DEGREE STUDENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211636-
dc.description.abstractThe recent Carnegie Report called for a radical transformation of nursing education including a critical recommended shift toward professional formation. At the same time, new programs, such as accelerated or second degree programs, have been developed to address the nursing shortage. These 12-18 month programs are proliferating in the U.S. in response to the huge demand. Students are admitted with a minimum of a baccalaureate degree in another field and successful completion of the admission prerequisites. This condensed, intense program, raises concerns for professional formation when there is so much content to learn and apply and so little time to reflect. Second degree students have been described as those with unique learning needs and styles. All students need structural supports and intentional educational strategies to maximize their formation for a smooth transition into practice. Unfortunately, little data exist about effective strategies that promote professional formation, particularly for second degree students. One university program recently introduced formation seminars-- intentional, guided discussions in the first two of five quarters in their program of study. Brief reflections collected at the end of each seminar provided qualitative data for analysis. Findings from the first term of the seminars, on such topics as Professionalism, Ethical Comportment, and Empathy, revealed that students could articulate their thinking about critical aspects of professional formation, such as a growing realization of the 24/7 role of the nurse and an explicit focus on the patient rather than themselves. Additional themes that emerged centered on the value of and communication within the healthcare team and an appreciation for the standards that guide nursing practice. This session will focus on the outcomes from the second term’s professional formation seminars, which included topics such as Professional Practice, Nurse as Teacher, and Teamwork. Early analysis revealed that students are clearly thinking and talking about aspects of professional formation and how it relates to their current practice as well as their future professional practice, suggesting that the learning activities were useful in guiding students’ thinking about their practice as professional nurses.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse education trendsen_GB
dc.subjectNursing shortageen_GB
dc.subjectSecond degree programsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:30Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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