2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211637
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PRECONCEPTION PRACTICES AND NEEDS AMONG BATTERED WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the preconception practices and needs among battered women, also known as women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Background: Previous research shows that the promotion of a woman’s health before she becomes pregnant, known as preconception health, positively impacts birth outcomes.  Growing evidence indicates that women who experience IPV have more difficulties achieving optimal preconception health. Methods: This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Women aged 20 and above who were abused by their partners before and during their last pregnancy were recruited from one domestic violence shelter in northern Texas. Following Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, focus group interviews were conducted with study participants. Transcribed data were analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Results: The study participants identified their abusive relationship as the biggest barrier in achieving optimal preconception health. Other barriers included financial difficulties and lack of knowledge. Some women reported that they had little or no control over their own contraception.  They rarely discussed birth control with their abusive partners. Most women had experienced more than one unplanned pregnancy. Common pregnancy complications reported were preeclampsia, placenta previa, and preterm labor. There is a consensus among the participants that most of these complications could have been prevented. All women also agreed that preconception health is important. Although most women acknowledged that they did not pay attention to their preconception health, they expressed an interest to receive preconception care from healthcare professionals. Implications: Females experiencing IPV have challenges to healthy pregnancy. Educational and counseling services should be incorporated into routine check-ups for women of childbearing age.  Healthcare professionals play an important role in identifying women experiencing IPV and promoting optimal preconception health among this growing population.
Keywords:
Battered women; Domestic abuse; Preconception health
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5616
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePRECONCEPTION PRACTICES AND NEEDS AMONG BATTERED WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211637-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the preconception practices and needs among battered women, also known as women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Background: Previous research shows that the promotion of a woman’s health before she becomes pregnant, known as preconception health, positively impacts birth outcomes.  Growing evidence indicates that women who experience IPV have more difficulties achieving optimal preconception health. Methods: This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Women aged 20 and above who were abused by their partners before and during their last pregnancy were recruited from one domestic violence shelter in northern Texas. Following Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, focus group interviews were conducted with study participants. Transcribed data were analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Results: The study participants identified their abusive relationship as the biggest barrier in achieving optimal preconception health. Other barriers included financial difficulties and lack of knowledge. Some women reported that they had little or no control over their own contraception.  They rarely discussed birth control with their abusive partners. Most women had experienced more than one unplanned pregnancy. Common pregnancy complications reported were preeclampsia, placenta previa, and preterm labor. There is a consensus among the participants that most of these complications could have been prevented. All women also agreed that preconception health is important. Although most women acknowledged that they did not pay attention to their preconception health, they expressed an interest to receive preconception care from healthcare professionals. Implications: Females experiencing IPV have challenges to healthy pregnancy. Educational and counseling services should be incorporated into routine check-ups for women of childbearing age.  Healthcare professionals play an important role in identifying women experiencing IPV and promoting optimal preconception health among this growing population.en_GB
dc.subjectBattered womenen_GB
dc.subjectDomestic abuseen_GB
dc.subjectPreconception healthen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:34Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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