2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211638
Type:
Research Study
Title:
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS' SELF-ASSESSMENT USING THE BREADTH OF EDUCATION SURVEY
Abstract:
Purpose:  To report on a measure assessing breadth of education (BOE) using self-appraisals of undergraduate nursing students following the implementation of a statewide education consortium curriculum. Background and Rationale: Recognizing the need to improve faculty work life, increase enrollments to address workforce shortages, create access to baccalaureate nursing education throughout the state, and transform the educational environment based on an understanding of learning, the nursing program directors of a state-wide university system consisting of four-year institutions and community colleges created a nursing consortium.  The goal was to develop a centralized, learning-driven approach across the university system, using a new pedagogy, including concept-based and student-centered learning, spiraling curriculum, and clinical educational redesign. In 2009, three nursing schools in the university system implemented the statewide curriculum. Three nursing schools in the system did not. These will be used as a comparison group. Methods: This study reports on a measure developed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assure that educational interventions in nursing do not have an adverse impact on educational breadth. The items for the measure were based on competencies identified by the Baccalaureate Essentials, the Nursing Executive Center, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and other key professional organizations. A nonequivalent comparison group design was used. Students answered the survey at the start of their first academic year.  Those enrolled in the consortium programs (N = 228) and comparison sites (N = 121) rated their confidence and mastery performing 38 discrete nursing tasks. Results: A total of 349 students (57% AS /43% BS) completed the survey.  BS students indicated greater confidence in performing nursing tasks (t = -2.97, p < .01).  BOE scores were significantly higher in the intervention versus control schools (t=3.56, p < .001) but did not differ across race or sex.  A significant difference in BOE score was found between students who intended to obtain the baccalaureate degree versus those who did not intend to do so (t=3.13, p < .01).  Conclusions:  The findings suggest that baccalaureate and consortium students start their education with more confidence than their counterparts.  These trends need to be examined further as the BOE survey is administered at subsequent points in the students’ educational trajectory.
Keywords:
Undergraduate nursing students; self assessment; Breath of education
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5617
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleUNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS' SELF-ASSESSMENT USING THE BREADTH OF EDUCATION SURVEYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211638-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:  To report on a measure assessing breadth of education (BOE) using self-appraisals of undergraduate nursing students following the implementation of a statewide education consortium curriculum. Background and Rationale: Recognizing the need to improve faculty work life, increase enrollments to address workforce shortages, create access to baccalaureate nursing education throughout the state, and transform the educational environment based on an understanding of learning, the nursing program directors of a state-wide university system consisting of four-year institutions and community colleges created a nursing consortium.  The goal was to develop a centralized, learning-driven approach across the university system, using a new pedagogy, including concept-based and student-centered learning, spiraling curriculum, and clinical educational redesign. In 2009, three nursing schools in the university system implemented the statewide curriculum. Three nursing schools in the system did not. These will be used as a comparison group. Methods: This study reports on a measure developed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assure that educational interventions in nursing do not have an adverse impact on educational breadth. The items for the measure were based on competencies identified by the Baccalaureate Essentials, the Nursing Executive Center, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and other key professional organizations. A nonequivalent comparison group design was used. Students answered the survey at the start of their first academic year.  Those enrolled in the consortium programs (N = 228) and comparison sites (N = 121) rated their confidence and mastery performing 38 discrete nursing tasks. Results: A total of 349 students (57% AS /43% BS) completed the survey.  BS students indicated greater confidence in performing nursing tasks (t = -2.97, p < .01).  BOE scores were significantly higher in the intervention versus control schools (t=3.56, p < .001) but did not differ across race or sex.  A significant difference in BOE score was found between students who intended to obtain the baccalaureate degree versus those who did not intend to do so (t=3.13, p < .01).  Conclusions:  The findings suggest that baccalaureate and consortium students start their education with more confidence than their counterparts.  These trends need to be examined further as the BOE survey is administered at subsequent points in the students’ educational trajectory.en_GB
dc.subjectUndergraduate nursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectself assessmenten_GB
dc.subjectBreath of educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:37Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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