FACTORS INFLUENCING SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIORS OF HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS: A MULTISITE STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211640
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FACTORS INFLUENCING SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIORS OF HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS: A MULTISITE STUDY
Abstract:
Purpose/Aim: We explored the relationship between intrapersonal, psychosocial and contextual factors associated with sexual risk behavior among an ethnically diverse population of HIV-positive persons. Study participants (N= 1773) were recruited from 18 distinct sites in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This is a subset of data from a 22-site international project developed by the International Nursing Network for HIV/AIDS. Conceptual Basis: Framed in Social Action Theory, HIV-positive persons are viewed as being challenged with limiting the transmission of the virus to others.  Intrapersonal, psychosocial and environmental factors can moderate personal perceptions and beliefs, and health-related behaviors including condom use. A review of the literature indicates that sexual risk taking behavior is multi-factorial.  Factors considered for this analysis include demographics (age, sex, ethnicity), contextual factors (study region, substance use, years HIV positive) and psychosocial mediators (self-efficacy for condom use, and chronic disease management, stigma, treatment optimism and social support).  Self-efficacy is a self-evaluative belief that one can effectively perform a specific behavior (condom use) under different environmental conditions (new sex partner).  Methods: Using a cross sectional descriptive design, a convenience sample of persons living with HIV/AIDS was recruited through active outreach at HIV/AIDS health care and social service sites, specialty clinics, through private practice and at select residential living facilities. The study was approved by the institutional boards of each study site. A proxy variable of high risk sex included participants who reported engaging in sex with two or more partners during a three month recall period and reported not using condoms.  Results: Participants included mostly African American (43%), Caucasian (25%), Hispanic (24%), and Asian/Pacific Islander (3.0%) men (72%), with nearly half (48%) reporting the transmission risk of men having sex with men.  Over half of the men (56%) and the vast majority of women (90%) reported engaging in sex within the past 3 months. One quarter (25%) reported engaging in sex without condoms. Thirteen percent of the participants (n = 237) reported having multiple sex partners. Using linear regression (backward selection model), condom use self-efficacy, and race were significant predictors of having multiple SPs without consistent condom use. Lower condom use self-efficacy scores were associated with less condom use (β = -.08; p = 0.012), and compared to Caucasians, Asian Pacific Islanders were less likely to engage in sex with multiple partners without a condom (β = -3.4; p = 0.015).  Implications: Nurses must routinely discuss client HIV transmission-risk behaviors, and offer behavioral strategies that can enhance HIV-positive persons’ intentions to use condoms.  Encouraging open communication between sex partners about condom use is essential.  Further research is needed on the impact of race/ethnicity on sexual risk behaviors.
Keywords:
HIV positive persons; Sexual risk behavior; Diversity
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5629
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS INFLUENCING SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIORS OF HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS: A MULTISITE STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211640-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aim: We explored the relationship between intrapersonal, psychosocial and contextual factors associated with sexual risk behavior among an ethnically diverse population of HIV-positive persons. Study participants (N= 1773) were recruited from 18 distinct sites in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This is a subset of data from a 22-site international project developed by the International Nursing Network for HIV/AIDS. Conceptual Basis: Framed in Social Action Theory, HIV-positive persons are viewed as being challenged with limiting the transmission of the virus to others.  Intrapersonal, psychosocial and environmental factors can moderate personal perceptions and beliefs, and health-related behaviors including condom use. A review of the literature indicates that sexual risk taking behavior is multi-factorial.  Factors considered for this analysis include demographics (age, sex, ethnicity), contextual factors (study region, substance use, years HIV positive) and psychosocial mediators (self-efficacy for condom use, and chronic disease management, stigma, treatment optimism and social support).  Self-efficacy is a self-evaluative belief that one can effectively perform a specific behavior (condom use) under different environmental conditions (new sex partner).  Methods: Using a cross sectional descriptive design, a convenience sample of persons living with HIV/AIDS was recruited through active outreach at HIV/AIDS health care and social service sites, specialty clinics, through private practice and at select residential living facilities. The study was approved by the institutional boards of each study site. A proxy variable of high risk sex included participants who reported engaging in sex with two or more partners during a three month recall period and reported not using condoms.  Results: Participants included mostly African American (43%), Caucasian (25%), Hispanic (24%), and Asian/Pacific Islander (3.0%) men (72%), with nearly half (48%) reporting the transmission risk of men having sex with men.  Over half of the men (56%) and the vast majority of women (90%) reported engaging in sex within the past 3 months. One quarter (25%) reported engaging in sex without condoms. Thirteen percent of the participants (n = 237) reported having multiple sex partners. Using linear regression (backward selection model), condom use self-efficacy, and race were significant predictors of having multiple SPs without consistent condom use. Lower condom use self-efficacy scores were associated with less condom use (β = -.08; p = 0.012), and compared to Caucasians, Asian Pacific Islanders were less likely to engage in sex with multiple partners without a condom (β = -3.4; p = 0.015).  Implications: Nurses must routinely discuss client HIV transmission-risk behaviors, and offer behavioral strategies that can enhance HIV-positive persons’ intentions to use condoms.  Encouraging open communication between sex partners about condom use is essential.  Further research is needed on the impact of race/ethnicity on sexual risk behaviors.en_GB
dc.subjectHIV positive personsen_GB
dc.subjectSexual risk behavioren_GB
dc.subjectDiversityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:44Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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