LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES IN MAGNET AND NON-MAGNET HOSPITALS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211643
Type:
Research Study
Title:
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES IN MAGNET AND NON-MAGNET HOSPITALS
Abstract:
Purpose: This national study examined pedagogical practices used to facilitate leadership development for nurse managers and compared practices in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Background: Effective nursing leadership among nurse managers is critical to affordable, accessible, and high-quality healthcare. Nursing leadership improves patient safety, staff productivity, satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Nursing leadership also reduces patient mortality and staff nurse absenteeism. The American Nurses Credentialing Center sets standards of excellence for nursing leadership through its Magnet recognition program. The Institute of Medicine also emphasizes the essential role of nursing leadership in its most recent recommendations for the future of nursing. Despite this critical need, little is known regarding the pedagogical practices being used to facilitate leadership development for nurse managers. Methods: A stratified random sampling method was used to select participating Magnet hospitals (n=118, response rate 80%). A matched sampling method, using bed size, geographic location, governance structure, and status as a teaching hospital as criteria, was used in the selection of participating non-Magnet hospitals (n=46, response rate 44%). Using the Dillman Total Design Method, data was collected via electronic survey from the individual overseeing or facilitating the leadership development program for nurse managers in each participating hospital. The survey design was based on an evidence-based leadership development model, which identifies Assessment, Challenge, and Support as the three critical elements of effective leadership development programs. Survey items were clustered into these three subscales. Participants used a Likert-type scale to indicate how frequently each item was incorporated into their respective programs (1=Never or Rarely, 2=Sometimes, 3=Usually, and 4=Frequently or Always). Descriptive statistics were used to examine the pedagogical practices used, and the independent samples t-test was used to compare practices in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Results: The overall Pedagogical Practices score for Magnet hospitals was 3.07 (SD=0.60), with mean subscale scores of 2.69 (SD=0.64) for Assessment, 3.06 (SD=0.75) for Challenge, and 3.19 (SD, 0.71) for Support. The overall Pedagogical Practices score for non-Magnet hospitals was 2.54 (SD=0.70), with mean subscale scores of 2.67 (SD=0.71) for Assessment, 2.74 (SD=0.82) for Challenge, and 2.81 (SD=0.83) for Support. Differences between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals were statistically significant in the overall Pedagogical Practices scale (t= -2.73, df=71.96, p<0.01), the Assessment subscale (t= -2.56, df=73.15, p<0.01), and the Challenge subscale (t= -2.82, df=73.15, p<0.01). Differences between Magnet and non-Magnet hospital were not statistically significant in the Support subscale (t= -1.73, df=71.61, p<0.09). Implications: Results suggest opportunities exist for improving pedagogical design in leadership development programs, particularly in non-Magnet hospitals. Longitudinal case-study research, including both qualitative and quantitative methods, may provide a deeper, more detailed understanding of the implementation and effectiveness of current leadership development practices in selected hospital settings. Experimental and quasi-experimental research is needed to determine the relative effectiveness of various pedagogical models for leadership development.
Keywords:
Nurse manager; Leadership development; Magnet hospital
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5633
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleLEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES IN MAGNET AND NON-MAGNET HOSPITALSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211643-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This national study examined pedagogical practices used to facilitate leadership development for nurse managers and compared practices in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Background: Effective nursing leadership among nurse managers is critical to affordable, accessible, and high-quality healthcare. Nursing leadership improves patient safety, staff productivity, satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Nursing leadership also reduces patient mortality and staff nurse absenteeism. The American Nurses Credentialing Center sets standards of excellence for nursing leadership through its Magnet recognition program. The Institute of Medicine also emphasizes the essential role of nursing leadership in its most recent recommendations for the future of nursing. Despite this critical need, little is known regarding the pedagogical practices being used to facilitate leadership development for nurse managers. Methods: A stratified random sampling method was used to select participating Magnet hospitals (n=118, response rate 80%). A matched sampling method, using bed size, geographic location, governance structure, and status as a teaching hospital as criteria, was used in the selection of participating non-Magnet hospitals (n=46, response rate 44%). Using the Dillman Total Design Method, data was collected via electronic survey from the individual overseeing or facilitating the leadership development program for nurse managers in each participating hospital. The survey design was based on an evidence-based leadership development model, which identifies Assessment, Challenge, and Support as the three critical elements of effective leadership development programs. Survey items were clustered into these three subscales. Participants used a Likert-type scale to indicate how frequently each item was incorporated into their respective programs (1=Never or Rarely, 2=Sometimes, 3=Usually, and 4=Frequently or Always). Descriptive statistics were used to examine the pedagogical practices used, and the independent samples t-test was used to compare practices in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Results: The overall Pedagogical Practices score for Magnet hospitals was 3.07 (SD=0.60), with mean subscale scores of 2.69 (SD=0.64) for Assessment, 3.06 (SD=0.75) for Challenge, and 3.19 (SD, 0.71) for Support. The overall Pedagogical Practices score for non-Magnet hospitals was 2.54 (SD=0.70), with mean subscale scores of 2.67 (SD=0.71) for Assessment, 2.74 (SD=0.82) for Challenge, and 2.81 (SD=0.83) for Support. Differences between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals were statistically significant in the overall Pedagogical Practices scale (t= -2.73, df=71.96, p<0.01), the Assessment subscale (t= -2.56, df=73.15, p<0.01), and the Challenge subscale (t= -2.82, df=73.15, p<0.01). Differences between Magnet and non-Magnet hospital were not statistically significant in the Support subscale (t= -1.73, df=71.61, p<0.09). Implications: Results suggest opportunities exist for improving pedagogical design in leadership development programs, particularly in non-Magnet hospitals. Longitudinal case-study research, including both qualitative and quantitative methods, may provide a deeper, more detailed understanding of the implementation and effectiveness of current leadership development practices in selected hospital settings. Experimental and quasi-experimental research is needed to determine the relative effectiveness of various pedagogical models for leadership development.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse manageren_GB
dc.subjectLeadership developmenten_GB
dc.subjectMagnet hospitalen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:05:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:05:55Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:05:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.