2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211645
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING: NURSING HOME ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT
Abstract:
Purpose.  The purpose of this pilot study is to identify and examine the roles and responsibilities of directors of nursing (DON) in nursing homes, focusing specifically on the administrative and managerial aspects of nursing services. Rationale/Background.  DONs are in key leadership positions to enhance the quality and cost-efficiencies of nursing home care.  Nurses often gain access to DON positions as a result of clinical expertise and geographic availability, rather than formal educational preparation.  Recurrent reports of poor quality and high rates of turnover among all nursing staff, including DONs, raise concerns regarding the extent to which DONs are adequately prepared for and supported to carry out the administrative and managerial aspects of this important nursing leadership position. Methods. A descriptive, cross-sectional, exploratory design was used to collect qualitative data from interviews with a convenience sample of DONs and other nurse leaders with knowledge or expertise about the DON position (n=19).  Semi-structured interviews lasting up to one hour were conducted by telephone and audio-taped.  The interviews focused on perceptions, understandings, interpretations, and expectations associated with the administrative and managerial aspects of the DON position.  Data analysis included microanalysis coding and thematic analysis of transcribed interviews to identify major themes and patterns. Results.  This study revealed a broad and complex DON job description, with human resource management (HR) and financial/budget management as two core elements.  Substantial variations in scope of responsibilities were identified, based on facility size.  Few DONs reported having received any formal training for this position. Barriers to role performance include limited resources, a lack of adequately-trained staff, and multiple competing demands.  The DON’s positive relationship with the nursing home administrator and the support available in larger facilities (i.e., experts, consultants, mentors) were identified as facilitating factors. Implications. With aging boomers, demand for high quality, cost effective nursing home care is expected to escalate.  An urgent need exists to maximize the capacity of the DON workforce to enhance the quality of care, through effective leadership and cost-efficient management of the organizational and clinical challenges inherent in these settings. The findings from this study will provide preliminary data for an industry-wide job analysis of the nursing home DON position.   The job analysis will provide a basis for: (1) exploring existing job designs and potential restructuring of management teams to optimize the capacity of the DON position; (2) future research to support policy review of DON entry-level qualifications; and (3) education, training, and experience interventions.
Keywords:
Director of nursing role; Nursing homes
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5638
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE DIRECTOR OF NURSING: NURSING HOME ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211645-
dc.description.abstractPurpose.  The purpose of this pilot study is to identify and examine the roles and responsibilities of directors of nursing (DON) in nursing homes, focusing specifically on the administrative and managerial aspects of nursing services. Rationale/Background.  DONs are in key leadership positions to enhance the quality and cost-efficiencies of nursing home care.  Nurses often gain access to DON positions as a result of clinical expertise and geographic availability, rather than formal educational preparation.  Recurrent reports of poor quality and high rates of turnover among all nursing staff, including DONs, raise concerns regarding the extent to which DONs are adequately prepared for and supported to carry out the administrative and managerial aspects of this important nursing leadership position. Methods. A descriptive, cross-sectional, exploratory design was used to collect qualitative data from interviews with a convenience sample of DONs and other nurse leaders with knowledge or expertise about the DON position (n=19).  Semi-structured interviews lasting up to one hour were conducted by telephone and audio-taped.  The interviews focused on perceptions, understandings, interpretations, and expectations associated with the administrative and managerial aspects of the DON position.  Data analysis included microanalysis coding and thematic analysis of transcribed interviews to identify major themes and patterns. Results.  This study revealed a broad and complex DON job description, with human resource management (HR) and financial/budget management as two core elements.  Substantial variations in scope of responsibilities were identified, based on facility size.  Few DONs reported having received any formal training for this position. Barriers to role performance include limited resources, a lack of adequately-trained staff, and multiple competing demands.  The DON’s positive relationship with the nursing home administrator and the support available in larger facilities (i.e., experts, consultants, mentors) were identified as facilitating factors. Implications. With aging boomers, demand for high quality, cost effective nursing home care is expected to escalate.  An urgent need exists to maximize the capacity of the DON workforce to enhance the quality of care, through effective leadership and cost-efficient management of the organizational and clinical challenges inherent in these settings. The findings from this study will provide preliminary data for an industry-wide job analysis of the nursing home DON position.   The job analysis will provide a basis for: (1) exploring existing job designs and potential restructuring of management teams to optimize the capacity of the DON position; (2) future research to support policy review of DON entry-level qualifications; and (3) education, training, and experience interventions.en_GB
dc.subjectDirector of nursing roleen_GB
dc.subjectNursing homesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:02Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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