2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211646
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A PARENT-DIRECTED PORTION EDUCATION INTERVENTION FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
Abstract:
Background:  Portion sizes in the United States (U.S.) have greatly increased over the last 20 years, which some researchers believe is contributing to the rising prevalence of overweight/obesity in children. Despite evidence that increased portion sizes may contribute to overweight/obesity in young children, guidelines for feeding preschool children remain unclear and difficult for healthcare providers to relate to parents. Methods:  The purpose of this single-group pilot study, which used a pre-/post-test design, was to determine the effects of a parent-focused, skill-building intervention regarding child nutrition and portion sizes on parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition for preschoolers, parents’ provision of food to their child, and the child’s dietary intake. The information, motivation, and behavior skills model was the undergirding theoretical framework for this study in which behavior skills is the partial mediator of behavioral change. Following IRB approval, 45 participant parents were recruited and enrolled. All of the parents were mothers, 23-53 years old (M = 34.6 years, SD = 6.4); and their children were 4-6 years of age (M = 4.5 years, SD = 0.6).  After completing formal consenting, baseline data gathering occurred. In addition to a demographic questionnaire, measures included a nutrition knowledge questionnaire and a photographic diet diary. The intervention consisted of the delivery of a manualized, parent-directed, hour-long individual session to discuss child nutrition information, age appropriate portion recommendations, and parents were offered portion-related skills activities to complete. Each parent was provided with a portion education plate, the Beary Healthy Plate, to assist participant parents to refine their skills regarding the provision of appropriate food portion sizes to their young children. Results:  Paired samples t tests were completed to examine the difference between macronutrients the mothers served and children consumed at pre- and post-testing.  The average total daily calories mothers served significantly decreased (t = 3.92, p = .00), as did the average total daily calories the children ate (t = 3.35, p = .00) and the average amounts of fat/saturated fat, protein, and carbohydrates from pre- to post-testing.  Effect sizes for each macronutrient ranged from .10 to .60, with medium effects for the total daily calories and carbohydrates served and consumed. However, no significant difference was found between pre- (M = 14.8) and post-test (M = 15.3) scores for parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition (t = -1.12, p = .26). Conclusions:  This suggests that the outcomes appreciated were most likely related to parents utilizing their portion skills and right-sizing the portions served to their preschool children.  These preliminary findings warrant a full-scale, randomized control investigation.
Keywords:
Childhood obesity; Portion control; Intervention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5639
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA PARENT-DIRECTED PORTION EDUCATION INTERVENTION FOR YOUNG CHILDRENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211646-
dc.description.abstractBackground:  Portion sizes in the United States (U.S.) have greatly increased over the last 20 years, which some researchers believe is contributing to the rising prevalence of overweight/obesity in children. Despite evidence that increased portion sizes may contribute to overweight/obesity in young children, guidelines for feeding preschool children remain unclear and difficult for healthcare providers to relate to parents. Methods:  The purpose of this single-group pilot study, which used a pre-/post-test design, was to determine the effects of a parent-focused, skill-building intervention regarding child nutrition and portion sizes on parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition for preschoolers, parents’ provision of food to their child, and the child’s dietary intake. The information, motivation, and behavior skills model was the undergirding theoretical framework for this study in which behavior skills is the partial mediator of behavioral change. Following IRB approval, 45 participant parents were recruited and enrolled. All of the parents were mothers, 23-53 years old (M = 34.6 years, SD = 6.4); and their children were 4-6 years of age (M = 4.5 years, SD = 0.6).  After completing formal consenting, baseline data gathering occurred. In addition to a demographic questionnaire, measures included a nutrition knowledge questionnaire and a photographic diet diary. The intervention consisted of the delivery of a manualized, parent-directed, hour-long individual session to discuss child nutrition information, age appropriate portion recommendations, and parents were offered portion-related skills activities to complete. Each parent was provided with a portion education plate, the Beary Healthy Plate, to assist participant parents to refine their skills regarding the provision of appropriate food portion sizes to their young children. Results:  Paired samples t tests were completed to examine the difference between macronutrients the mothers served and children consumed at pre- and post-testing.  The average total daily calories mothers served significantly decreased (t = 3.92, p = .00), as did the average total daily calories the children ate (t = 3.35, p = .00) and the average amounts of fat/saturated fat, protein, and carbohydrates from pre- to post-testing.  Effect sizes for each macronutrient ranged from .10 to .60, with medium effects for the total daily calories and carbohydrates served and consumed. However, no significant difference was found between pre- (M = 14.8) and post-test (M = 15.3) scores for parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition (t = -1.12, p = .26). Conclusions:  This suggests that the outcomes appreciated were most likely related to parents utilizing their portion skills and right-sizing the portions served to their preschool children.  These preliminary findings warrant a full-scale, randomized control investigation.en_GB
dc.subjectChildhood obesityen_GB
dc.subjectPortion controlen_GB
dc.subjectInterventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:06Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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