2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211647
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE EXAMINATION OF WAGE PREMIUMS FOR UNIONIZED AND TRAVEL NURSES
Abstract:
Background: The health care industry has witnessed two trends over the last decade: 1). a resurgence in union activity in the hospital setting; and 2). the use of travel nurses to supplement nursing staff in the hospital setting during times of shortage. While union participation and travel nursing have both been associated with higher wages, we do not know the extent to which wages differ among unionized and non-unionized nurses and travel and facility employed nurses. Purpose: This study estimates wage equations for nurses focusing on the attributes, knowledge, and abilities possessed by nurses that may increase their wage. In particular, we examine wage differences for unionized and non-unionized nurses and travel and facility employed nurses. Methods: Data from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, 2008 public use file were used to model RN wages and examine union and non-unionized and travel-facility employed wage differentials. We restricted our sample to those nurses who were employed in nursing in the USA in 2008. The final RN sample was 28,158 (4,290 unionized nurses, 23,868 non-unionized nurses, 560 travel nurses, and 25, 802 facility employed nurses). Feasible generalized least squares regression was used to estimate the RN wage equation and to estimate wage equations for unionized, non-unionized, travel, and facility employed nurses. The wage differential for unionized and non-unionized nurses and for travel and facility employed nurses were analyzed using a decomposition technique developed by Oaxaca (1973) and refined by Holtzmann and Idson (1993). STATA 12 was used for all analyses. Outcomes: The results of the full wage model show that unionized wages were 7.3% higher than non-unionized nurses. Also nurses who were travelers earned 10% more than facility employed nurses. Nurses prepared with the associate degree or diploma degree as their highest nursing degree earned wages 3.6% less than nurses with a baccalaureate degree.  Additionally, male nurses wages were 9.1% higher than female nurses and nurses who were non-white earned 3.9% more than white nurses.  Finally years of experience, working in the hospital, and working in the Pacific region all had a positive effect on wage.  The wage decomposition results show that unionized wages were approximately 13.8% more than non-unionized nurse, while travel nurse wages were approximately 12.5% more than facility employed nurse wages. Further, 44.7% of the total wage difference for unionized nurses can be attributed to wage-generating attributes, while 55.3% can be attributed to coefficient effects that represent an unexplained premium. Similarly, 15.7% of the total wage difference for travelers can be attributed to wage generating attributes, while the remaining 84.3% can be viewed as a premium. Conclusions:  Are the wage premiums experienced by unionized nurses enough to sustain the resurgence of union activity seen in the hospital setting? Further, are the wage premiums experienced by travel nurses sufficient to overcome the lack of benefits they forgo by not being facility employed? These and other issues will be discussed during our presentation.
Keywords:
Travel nursing; Nurse unions; Nurse wages
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5641
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE EXAMINATION OF WAGE PREMIUMS FOR UNIONIZED AND TRAVEL NURSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211647-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The health care industry has witnessed two trends over the last decade: 1). a resurgence in union activity in the hospital setting; and 2). the use of travel nurses to supplement nursing staff in the hospital setting during times of shortage. While union participation and travel nursing have both been associated with higher wages, we do not know the extent to which wages differ among unionized and non-unionized nurses and travel and facility employed nurses. Purpose: This study estimates wage equations for nurses focusing on the attributes, knowledge, and abilities possessed by nurses that may increase their wage. In particular, we examine wage differences for unionized and non-unionized nurses and travel and facility employed nurses. Methods: Data from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, 2008 public use file were used to model RN wages and examine union and non-unionized and travel-facility employed wage differentials. We restricted our sample to those nurses who were employed in nursing in the USA in 2008. The final RN sample was 28,158 (4,290 unionized nurses, 23,868 non-unionized nurses, 560 travel nurses, and 25, 802 facility employed nurses). Feasible generalized least squares regression was used to estimate the RN wage equation and to estimate wage equations for unionized, non-unionized, travel, and facility employed nurses. The wage differential for unionized and non-unionized nurses and for travel and facility employed nurses were analyzed using a decomposition technique developed by Oaxaca (1973) and refined by Holtzmann and Idson (1993). STATA 12 was used for all analyses. Outcomes: The results of the full wage model show that unionized wages were 7.3% higher than non-unionized nurses. Also nurses who were travelers earned 10% more than facility employed nurses. Nurses prepared with the associate degree or diploma degree as their highest nursing degree earned wages 3.6% less than nurses with a baccalaureate degree.  Additionally, male nurses wages were 9.1% higher than female nurses and nurses who were non-white earned 3.9% more than white nurses.  Finally years of experience, working in the hospital, and working in the Pacific region all had a positive effect on wage.  The wage decomposition results show that unionized wages were approximately 13.8% more than non-unionized nurse, while travel nurse wages were approximately 12.5% more than facility employed nurse wages. Further, 44.7% of the total wage difference for unionized nurses can be attributed to wage-generating attributes, while 55.3% can be attributed to coefficient effects that represent an unexplained premium. Similarly, 15.7% of the total wage difference for travelers can be attributed to wage generating attributes, while the remaining 84.3% can be viewed as a premium. Conclusions:  Are the wage premiums experienced by unionized nurses enough to sustain the resurgence of union activity seen in the hospital setting? Further, are the wage premiums experienced by travel nurses sufficient to overcome the lack of benefits they forgo by not being facility employed? These and other issues will be discussed during our presentation.en_GB
dc.subjectTravel nursingen_GB
dc.subjectNurse unionsen_GB
dc.subjectNurse wagesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:09Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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