2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211648
Type:
Research Study
Title:
GRADUATE PERSPECTIVES ON PREPARING TO CARE FOR OLDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The aim of this presentation is to describe the success and limitations of graduate preparation of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) across a large university system and to provide guidance for future curricular revisions. Rationale:  In 2010, the American College of Nurses (AACN) together with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF) revised and updated the competencies for preparing students to adequately care for older adults. AACN recommended the closure of "stand alone" geriatric nurse practitioner programs (GNP) because certified GNPs only comprise 2.6% of all advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in the U.S. Older adults are expected to grow from 12% today to 20% by 2030. In 2010, the University of Colorado, Denver (UCD) was awarded funding to review and revise curricula to prepare APRN students to successfully complete the newly proposed AGNP certification exam. This award is the first formal collaborative and cooperative agreement between the two largest publicly  funded APRN programs in Colorado- (UCD) and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs(UCCS). Faculty recognized the value of input from former graduates as to the adequacy of their educational preparation to care for older adults. Methods: We used a mixed methods approach (focus groups and electronic surveys) to explore practicing APRNs experiences with preparation for practice with older adults. In addition to UCD and UCCS, this process was replicated by a noted university in the Northeast to garner their former graduates recommendations for curricular revision. Focus Group interviews lasting 90-120 minutes were conducted with APRNs who graduated within the last 5 years (n=6).  The focus of these analyses is unstructured responses to ‘how well were you prepared to care for older adults?’ Qualitative theme analysis was applied to the textual data about the rhetoric of course preparation and the expressed realities of complex APRN practice. The national competency domains were then used as an interpretive lens to analyze existing themes and meanings.  Data analysis also applied the principles of Miles and Huberman (1994) to remain open to new and unexpected occurrences beyond the coding framework providing a structure to organize content and frame conclusions within the context. This analysis then informed domains for an electronic survey to further validate key themes that was sent to all APRN graduates (n=300). Results: Experiences of APRNs give voice to the reality that end of life issues, hospice and advanced care planning are missing from educational preparation for their role in caring for the older adult. Complex family dynamics, geriatric syndromes and poly-pharmacy influence APRN decision making and self-care support across care settings. Implications: The findings from this study demonstrate an incongruence between the rapidly aging population and the adequacy of appropriate context related preparation for practice. APRN education should emphasize the significance and specific nuances of context, including rural settings and family care clinics in which older adults also seek care.
Keywords:
Nurse education; Curriculum revisions; Advanced Practice Registered Nurses
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5642
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleGRADUATE PERSPECTIVES ON PREPARING TO CARE FOR OLDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211648-
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The aim of this presentation is to describe the success and limitations of graduate preparation of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) across a large university system and to provide guidance for future curricular revisions. Rationale:  In 2010, the American College of Nurses (AACN) together with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF) revised and updated the competencies for preparing students to adequately care for older adults. AACN recommended the closure of "stand alone" geriatric nurse practitioner programs (GNP) because certified GNPs only comprise 2.6% of all advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in the U.S. Older adults are expected to grow from 12% today to 20% by 2030. In 2010, the University of Colorado, Denver (UCD) was awarded funding to review and revise curricula to prepare APRN students to successfully complete the newly proposed AGNP certification exam. This award is the first formal collaborative and cooperative agreement between the two largest publicly  funded APRN programs in Colorado- (UCD) and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs(UCCS). Faculty recognized the value of input from former graduates as to the adequacy of their educational preparation to care for older adults. Methods: We used a mixed methods approach (focus groups and electronic surveys) to explore practicing APRNs experiences with preparation for practice with older adults. In addition to UCD and UCCS, this process was replicated by a noted university in the Northeast to garner their former graduates recommendations for curricular revision. Focus Group interviews lasting 90-120 minutes were conducted with APRNs who graduated within the last 5 years (n=6).  The focus of these analyses is unstructured responses to ‘how well were you prepared to care for older adults?’ Qualitative theme analysis was applied to the textual data about the rhetoric of course preparation and the expressed realities of complex APRN practice. The national competency domains were then used as an interpretive lens to analyze existing themes and meanings.  Data analysis also applied the principles of Miles and Huberman (1994) to remain open to new and unexpected occurrences beyond the coding framework providing a structure to organize content and frame conclusions within the context. This analysis then informed domains for an electronic survey to further validate key themes that was sent to all APRN graduates (n=300). Results: Experiences of APRNs give voice to the reality that end of life issues, hospice and advanced care planning are missing from educational preparation for their role in caring for the older adult. Complex family dynamics, geriatric syndromes and poly-pharmacy influence APRN decision making and self-care support across care settings. Implications: The findings from this study demonstrate an incongruence between the rapidly aging population and the adequacy of appropriate context related preparation for practice. APRN education should emphasize the significance and specific nuances of context, including rural settings and family care clinics in which older adults also seek care.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse educationen_GB
dc.subjectCurriculum revisionsen_GB
dc.subjectAdvanced Practice Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:13Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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