STIGMA, DEPRESSION, QOL AND ALCOHOL USE AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS WITH HEPATITIS C

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211649
Type:
Research Study
Title:
STIGMA, DEPRESSION, QOL AND ALCOHOL USE AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS WITH HEPATITIS C
Abstract:
Objectives:  The specific research study aims are: (a) to characterize coping, stigma, depression, quality of life (QOL), and alcohol consumption among a sample of rural Southern California American Indians (AIs) living with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV); (b) to examine the relationship among the variables of coping, stigma, depression, QOL, and alcohol consumption among a sample of rural Southern California AIs living with HCV; and (c) to identify factors that explain the greatest amount of variance in QOL among a sample of rural Southern California AIs living with HCV. Background: Hepatitis C Virus is considered to be a global public health threat because seventy-five percent of infected persons have no symptoms and are unaware of their infection.  It is significant to note that AIs and Alaska Natives (ANs) commonly contend with issues that prevent them from receiving or seeking medical care.  These issues include cultural barriers, geographic isolation, educational level, and low income.  In 2007, AIs were twice as likely to develop a case of Hepatitis C, as compared to the White population.  The HCV infection is one of the most important causes of chronic liver disease in the United States.  It accounts for about 15 percent of acute viral hepatitis, 60 to 70 percent of chronic hepatitis, and up to 50 percent of cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and liver cancer. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational design with purposive sampling will be used for this study.  Self-administered survey data will be collected from AI adult persons with HCV receiving care at a Southern California clinic. Method: The Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) is a 66-item instrument designed to assess the coping style used by individuals when dealing with stressful encounters.  The HCV Stigma Scale (modified) is a 40-item scale measuring and assessing the stigma perceived by persons with HCV.  The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) Questionnaire is an instrument used to assess depression risks and consists of 20-items measuring six components: depressed mood, feelings of guilt and worthlessness, feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, psychomotor retardation, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbance.  The MOS SF-12v2 questionnaire is a 12-item instrument designed to assess QOL and views about a person’s health.  Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) is a 10-item screening instrument designed to assess patterns of alcohol consumption. Implications: The identification of factors that influence QOL in HCV patients has the potential to give direction to the development of nursing interventions or culturally-based care that may improve life quality in AI persons living with HCV.  This study will help to determine the level of coping, stigma, depression, QOL, and alcohol consumption among AI persons living with HCV.  Additionally, the study will determine the relationship between coping, stigma, depression, and alcohol consumption to QOL in AI persons living with HCV.  The research findings may have important implications for HCV education, treatment, AI/AN health care policy and practice improvements.
Keywords:
American Indians; Hepatitis C; Depression; Alcohol use; Quality of life
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5643
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSTIGMA, DEPRESSION, QOL AND ALCOHOL USE AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS WITH HEPATITIS Cen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211649-
dc.description.abstractObjectives:  The specific research study aims are: (a) to characterize coping, stigma, depression, quality of life (QOL), and alcohol consumption among a sample of rural Southern California American Indians (AIs) living with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV); (b) to examine the relationship among the variables of coping, stigma, depression, QOL, and alcohol consumption among a sample of rural Southern California AIs living with HCV; and (c) to identify factors that explain the greatest amount of variance in QOL among a sample of rural Southern California AIs living with HCV. Background: Hepatitis C Virus is considered to be a global public health threat because seventy-five percent of infected persons have no symptoms and are unaware of their infection.  It is significant to note that AIs and Alaska Natives (ANs) commonly contend with issues that prevent them from receiving or seeking medical care.  These issues include cultural barriers, geographic isolation, educational level, and low income.  In 2007, AIs were twice as likely to develop a case of Hepatitis C, as compared to the White population.  The HCV infection is one of the most important causes of chronic liver disease in the United States.  It accounts for about 15 percent of acute viral hepatitis, 60 to 70 percent of chronic hepatitis, and up to 50 percent of cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and liver cancer. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational design with purposive sampling will be used for this study.  Self-administered survey data will be collected from AI adult persons with HCV receiving care at a Southern California clinic. Method: The Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ) is a 66-item instrument designed to assess the coping style used by individuals when dealing with stressful encounters.  The HCV Stigma Scale (modified) is a 40-item scale measuring and assessing the stigma perceived by persons with HCV.  The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) Questionnaire is an instrument used to assess depression risks and consists of 20-items measuring six components: depressed mood, feelings of guilt and worthlessness, feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, psychomotor retardation, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbance.  The MOS SF-12v2 questionnaire is a 12-item instrument designed to assess QOL and views about a person’s health.  Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) is a 10-item screening instrument designed to assess patterns of alcohol consumption. Implications: The identification of factors that influence QOL in HCV patients has the potential to give direction to the development of nursing interventions or culturally-based care that may improve life quality in AI persons living with HCV.  This study will help to determine the level of coping, stigma, depression, QOL, and alcohol consumption among AI persons living with HCV.  Additionally, the study will determine the relationship between coping, stigma, depression, and alcohol consumption to QOL in AI persons living with HCV.  The research findings may have important implications for HCV education, treatment, AI/AN health care policy and practice improvements.en_GB
dc.subjectAmerican Indiansen_GB
dc.subjectHepatitis Cen_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectAlcohol useen_GB
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:17Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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