2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211650
Type:
Research Study
Title:
EVALUATING STUDENTS' REFLECTIVE THINKING: CRITIQUE OF MEASUREMENT TOOLS
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: To systematically review and evaluate reflective thinking measurement tools found in the health care education literature. Rationale: Reflective thinking is an integral part of many nursing education programs. It is thought to help narrow the theory-practice gap and solve novel situations (Schon, 1983), integrate different ways of knowing (Johns, 1995), and transform a perspective (Mezirow, 1991). Health care education researchers have developed and tested tools to measure students' reflective thinking. To date, no published study has examined the utility of these tools. Methods: CINAHL, ERIC, Medline and PsycINFO were searched using the keywords: reflective thinking or reflective practice together with assessment or evaluation or measurement. The search was limited to English language, peer-reviewed articles, health care professional students as subjects and articles presenting an original measurement method. Two-hundred and forty-eight articles were retrieved. Abstracts were reviewed. Of the relevant articles, references were hand searched for articles missed in the electronic search. Each tool was evaluated against four criteria: reliability; validity; responsiveness to change; and, efficiency and practicality of implementation. Tools were deemed as having more utility if they fulfilled more rather than less of the criteria. Results: Fourteen unique reflective thinking evaluation tools were identified.  Only two tools achieved three of the four criteria: the Groningen Reflection Ability Scale (GRAS) and a tool developed by Wallman, Lindblad, Hall, Lundmark and Ring (2008). Most authors failed to test their tool's responsiveness to change. Implications: The value of these tools is evaluating whether reflective thinking curricula is succeeding in developing reflective practitioners. However, currently there is no standard method for evaluating students' reflective thinking skills. There is a need for tools that are reliable, valid, responsive to change and efficient. Without, determining the effectiveness of reflective curricula for developing students' reflective thinking is limited.
Keywords:
Nurse education; Reflective teaching
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4712
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleEVALUATING STUDENTS' REFLECTIVE THINKING: CRITIQUE OF MEASUREMENT TOOLSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211650-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: To systematically review and evaluate reflective thinking measurement tools found in the health care education literature. Rationale: Reflective thinking is an integral part of many nursing education programs. It is thought to help narrow the theory-practice gap and solve novel situations (Schon, 1983), integrate different ways of knowing (Johns, 1995), and transform a perspective (Mezirow, 1991). Health care education researchers have developed and tested tools to measure students' reflective thinking. To date, no published study has examined the utility of these tools. Methods: CINAHL, ERIC, Medline and PsycINFO were searched using the keywords: reflective thinking or reflective practice together with assessment or evaluation or measurement. The search was limited to English language, peer-reviewed articles, health care professional students as subjects and articles presenting an original measurement method. Two-hundred and forty-eight articles were retrieved. Abstracts were reviewed. Of the relevant articles, references were hand searched for articles missed in the electronic search. Each tool was evaluated against four criteria: reliability; validity; responsiveness to change; and, efficiency and practicality of implementation. Tools were deemed as having more utility if they fulfilled more rather than less of the criteria. Results: Fourteen unique reflective thinking evaluation tools were identified.  Only two tools achieved three of the four criteria: the Groningen Reflection Ability Scale (GRAS) and a tool developed by Wallman, Lindblad, Hall, Lundmark and Ring (2008). Most authors failed to test their tool's responsiveness to change. Implications: The value of these tools is evaluating whether reflective thinking curricula is succeeding in developing reflective practitioners. However, currently there is no standard method for evaluating students' reflective thinking skills. There is a need for tools that are reliable, valid, responsive to change and efficient. Without, determining the effectiveness of reflective curricula for developing students' reflective thinking is limited.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse educationen_GB
dc.subjectReflective teachingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:20Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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