2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211652
Type:
Research Study
Title:
LATINOS AGING IN SKID ROW LOS ANGELES: THE PATH TO HOMELESSNES
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this community based research study was to explore the perception of older Latinos living in skid row on factors that may have contributed to their becoming homeless.  Results provide a framework for intervention, policy and program development to support the largely isolated elderly Latinos, thus reducing further structural isolation and health risks. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The graying of America has attracted increased media attention, as a growing number of individuals experience hunger, poverty and homelessness. In 2008, almost 44,000 seniors were homeless.  Within the next ten years, this figure may rise to almost 59,000 (33% increase).  By midcentury, the numbers may almost double, to 93,000.  Yet, little is known about the fastest growing elderly population, or Latino elders, and associated risk factors for homelessness. Even less is know about Latinos aging in skid row Los Angeles. How can we reconcile that members from a traditionally familistic orientation end up living alone and often isolated, homeless, or at best in single room occupancy hotels? Methods:  Utilizing a mixed quantitative and qualitative design, a bicultural and bilingual team of researchers recruited 20 older self-identified Latino men and women living in skid row.  Participants completed a survey and participated in semi-structured audio taped oral interviews; gathering demographics and exploring issues on homelessness, health, social support, health access, and agency support. Results:  Beyond the simple typology most identified in the literature  (job and housing loss and medical/social issues), the findings are significant, as the stories reveal multiple pathways intercept; including job/housing loss, family and network dissolution, violence, medical/social issues, language and cultural isolation, legal status and today’s sociopolitical climate.  Implications and Significance: The findings call into question the issue of homelessness for a diverse and aging population, and our healthcare system’s ability to fully assess and to provide culturally comprehensive health care and services to a growing homeless population.  For the discipline of nursing, the significance for nursing practice are that we will need to provide advanced training for assessing an individual’s risk for homelessness, while we also prepare to take leadership roles in order to advance a multidisciplinary community partnerships that address the totally of an invidividual’s health and environmental risks.
Keywords:
Homeless elderly Latinos; Homelessness; Self perception
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5647
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleLATINOS AGING IN SKID ROW LOS ANGELES: THE PATH TO HOMELESSNESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211652-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of this community based research study was to explore the perception of older Latinos living in skid row on factors that may have contributed to their becoming homeless.  Results provide a framework for intervention, policy and program development to support the largely isolated elderly Latinos, thus reducing further structural isolation and health risks. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The graying of America has attracted increased media attention, as a growing number of individuals experience hunger, poverty and homelessness. In 2008, almost 44,000 seniors were homeless.  Within the next ten years, this figure may rise to almost 59,000 (33% increase).  By midcentury, the numbers may almost double, to 93,000.  Yet, little is known about the fastest growing elderly population, or Latino elders, and associated risk factors for homelessness. Even less is know about Latinos aging in skid row Los Angeles. How can we reconcile that members from a traditionally familistic orientation end up living alone and often isolated, homeless, or at best in single room occupancy hotels? Methods:  Utilizing a mixed quantitative and qualitative design, a bicultural and bilingual team of researchers recruited 20 older self-identified Latino men and women living in skid row.  Participants completed a survey and participated in semi-structured audio taped oral interviews; gathering demographics and exploring issues on homelessness, health, social support, health access, and agency support. Results:  Beyond the simple typology most identified in the literature  (job and housing loss and medical/social issues), the findings are significant, as the stories reveal multiple pathways intercept; including job/housing loss, family and network dissolution, violence, medical/social issues, language and cultural isolation, legal status and today’s sociopolitical climate.  Implications and Significance: The findings call into question the issue of homelessness for a diverse and aging population, and our healthcare system’s ability to fully assess and to provide culturally comprehensive health care and services to a growing homeless population.  For the discipline of nursing, the significance for nursing practice are that we will need to provide advanced training for assessing an individual’s risk for homelessness, while we also prepare to take leadership roles in order to advance a multidisciplinary community partnerships that address the totally of an invidividual’s health and environmental risks.en_GB
dc.subjectHomeless elderly Latinosen_GB
dc.subjectHomelessnessen_GB
dc.subjectSelf perceptionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:27Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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