TELEPHONE EDUCATION & COUNSELING: LATINA BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS & SUPPORT PARTNERS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211654
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TELEPHONE EDUCATION & COUNSELING: LATINA BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS & SUPPORT PARTNERS
Abstract:
PURPOSE/SPECIFIC AIMS: This study examined the effectiveness of two psychosocial interventions for Latinas with breast cancer and their supportive partners.  Supportive partners are defined in this study as anyone the cancer survivor selects to participate in the intervention with her. The interventions were designed for delivery over the telephone to reduce access barriers and in Spanish to minimize linguistic barriers. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer in Latinas is a highly prevalent disease with significant health disparities in cancer diagnosis, treatment outcomes, and 5-year survival rates.  Limitations in access to care and treatment contribute to this disparity. Latinas with breast cancer are underrepresented in research on psychosocial interventions despite their high risk for psychological morbidity and the efficacy of psychosocial interventions is not well established in this population. METHODS: 90 dyads (Latinas and their supportive partners) were randomly assigned to a health education intervention that reviewed printed materials on breast cancer, health, and wellness, or an interpersonal counseling intervention that addressed 1) mood and affect management, 2) emotional expression, 3) interpersonal communication and relationships, 4) social support, and 5) cancer information.  Breast cancer survivors each received one weekly call over 8 weeks, and their partners received a call every other week over the same 8 weeks.  Quality of life assessments were made at baseline (T1), T1 + 8 weeks, and T1 + 16 weeks.  Quality of life was assessed with measures of psychological (depression, negative affect, stress, and anxiety), physical (fatigue, symptom distress), social, and spiritual well-being. RESULTS: The typical Latina participating in this study was 47.34 years of age, Mexican American (77.2%), married (67.5%), had less than a high school education (52.6%), income less than $30,000 (72.6%), and was unemployed (60%).  The majority of partners were spouses/significant others or female family members. Both breast cancer survivors and their supportive partners evidenced statistically significant improvements (p < .01) in virtually all dimensions of quality of life over the course of the investigation. However, there was no evidence pointing to the superiority of one intervention over the other. CONCUSIONS AND RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Latinas with breast cancer and their supportive partners experienced substantially increased quality of life pursuant to participating in either a health education or interpersonal counseling intervention. The findings support further testing of these two interventions in disadvantaged populations and further analysis of the interventions’ mechanisms responsible for these improvements. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: These findings underscore the value of designing interventions that overcome access and language barriers, and inclusion of intimate partners and family members in interventions for Latinas with breast cancer.
Keywords:
Latina breast cancer survivors; Partner support; Intervention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5657
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTELEPHONE EDUCATION & COUNSELING: LATINA BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS & SUPPORT PARTNERSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211654-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/SPECIFIC AIMS: This study examined the effectiveness of two psychosocial interventions for Latinas with breast cancer and their supportive partners.  Supportive partners are defined in this study as anyone the cancer survivor selects to participate in the intervention with her. The interventions were designed for delivery over the telephone to reduce access barriers and in Spanish to minimize linguistic barriers. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer in Latinas is a highly prevalent disease with significant health disparities in cancer diagnosis, treatment outcomes, and 5-year survival rates.  Limitations in access to care and treatment contribute to this disparity. Latinas with breast cancer are underrepresented in research on psychosocial interventions despite their high risk for psychological morbidity and the efficacy of psychosocial interventions is not well established in this population. METHODS: 90 dyads (Latinas and their supportive partners) were randomly assigned to a health education intervention that reviewed printed materials on breast cancer, health, and wellness, or an interpersonal counseling intervention that addressed 1) mood and affect management, 2) emotional expression, 3) interpersonal communication and relationships, 4) social support, and 5) cancer information.  Breast cancer survivors each received one weekly call over 8 weeks, and their partners received a call every other week over the same 8 weeks.  Quality of life assessments were made at baseline (T1), T1 + 8 weeks, and T1 + 16 weeks.  Quality of life was assessed with measures of psychological (depression, negative affect, stress, and anxiety), physical (fatigue, symptom distress), social, and spiritual well-being. RESULTS: The typical Latina participating in this study was 47.34 years of age, Mexican American (77.2%), married (67.5%), had less than a high school education (52.6%), income less than $30,000 (72.6%), and was unemployed (60%).  The majority of partners were spouses/significant others or female family members. Both breast cancer survivors and their supportive partners evidenced statistically significant improvements (p < .01) in virtually all dimensions of quality of life over the course of the investigation. However, there was no evidence pointing to the superiority of one intervention over the other. CONCUSIONS AND RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Latinas with breast cancer and their supportive partners experienced substantially increased quality of life pursuant to participating in either a health education or interpersonal counseling intervention. The findings support further testing of these two interventions in disadvantaged populations and further analysis of the interventions’ mechanisms responsible for these improvements. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: These findings underscore the value of designing interventions that overcome access and language barriers, and inclusion of intimate partners and family members in interventions for Latinas with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.subjectLatina breast cancer survivorsen_GB
dc.subjectPartner supporten_GB
dc.subjectInterventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:34Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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