2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211659
Type:
Research Study
Title:
EXTENT AND SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY
Abstract:
Purpose:  The purpose of this paper is to describe the extent and sources of community members' knowledge about a national, longitudinal, epidemiological study, the National Children's Study (NCS) in Valencia County, New Mexico, after an extensive community outreach and engagement campaign. Background:  The NCS is a prospective cohort study of 100,000 children nationwide who will be followed from before birth until 21 years of age.  The purpose of the observational study is to examine genetic and environmental influences on children’s health and development.  Valencia County, New Mexico (55% Hispanic; 3% American Indian) is one of counties selected using probability-based methods for recruitment and retention of 1,300 pregnant women (1,000 children).  As part of a preliminary sub-study of alternate recruitment strategies for the NCS, women in Valencia County were recruited using door-to-door household contact.   An extensive community outreach and engagement campaign was conducted to increase the probability that families would be willing to open the door to investigators, participate in enumeration, and enroll in the Study. Methods:  The extensive, multi-modal community outreach and engagement campaign involved a locally produced mass media campaign (billboards, printed posters, radio, television, and newspaper); advance mailings to homes; flyers in water bills, local newsletters, and day care backpacks; one-on-one and group meetings; $5 donations to the public schools per household; use of a Community Liaison, and a Community Advisory Council.  Door-to-door recruiters visited households in selected segments of the County and asked residents to complete an enumeration procedure that provided information about household characteristics and composition.  If a woman > or equal to 18 lived in the household, she was asked to complete an interview to determine if she was pregnant or trying to get pregnant and eligible to participate in the Study.  Two of the questions in the interview are:  "Before today, had you heard about the National Children's Study?" (Yes, no, refused, don't know); and "How did you hear about the National Children's Study? (20 specific options, other, refused, and don't know). Results*:  N households were visited in the County, n were enumerated, and n women completed eligibility interviews.  The majority of women (%) completing the interview had heard about the Study although there was some variation over time and across geographic segments visited.  Of those women, the majority (%) had heard about the Study from multiple sources.  Top sources of information about the Study included advanced mailings to households (%), billboards (%), print media (%), radio (%), and television (%). Implications: Outreach and engagement strategies used in this Study were effective in reaching the majority of potential Study participants.  Advanced direct mailing and billboards were the most effective strategies for publicizing information about the Study.  It is anticipated that future recruitment and retention of women and families in the Study will be highly dependent on the success of community outreach and engagement activities.
Keywords:
National Children's Study; Community knowledge
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5677
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleEXTENT AND SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211659-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:  The purpose of this paper is to describe the extent and sources of community members' knowledge about a national, longitudinal, epidemiological study, the National Children's Study (NCS) in Valencia County, New Mexico, after an extensive community outreach and engagement campaign. Background:  The NCS is a prospective cohort study of 100,000 children nationwide who will be followed from before birth until 21 years of age.  The purpose of the observational study is to examine genetic and environmental influences on children’s health and development.  Valencia County, New Mexico (55% Hispanic; 3% American Indian) is one of counties selected using probability-based methods for recruitment and retention of 1,300 pregnant women (1,000 children).  As part of a preliminary sub-study of alternate recruitment strategies for the NCS, women in Valencia County were recruited using door-to-door household contact.   An extensive community outreach and engagement campaign was conducted to increase the probability that families would be willing to open the door to investigators, participate in enumeration, and enroll in the Study. Methods:  The extensive, multi-modal community outreach and engagement campaign involved a locally produced mass media campaign (billboards, printed posters, radio, television, and newspaper); advance mailings to homes; flyers in water bills, local newsletters, and day care backpacks; one-on-one and group meetings; $5 donations to the public schools per household; use of a Community Liaison, and a Community Advisory Council.  Door-to-door recruiters visited households in selected segments of the County and asked residents to complete an enumeration procedure that provided information about household characteristics and composition.  If a woman > or equal to 18 lived in the household, she was asked to complete an interview to determine if she was pregnant or trying to get pregnant and eligible to participate in the Study.  Two of the questions in the interview are:  "Before today, had you heard about the National Children's Study?" (Yes, no, refused, don't know); and "How did you hear about the National Children's Study? (20 specific options, other, refused, and don't know). Results*:  N households were visited in the County, n were enumerated, and n women completed eligibility interviews.  The majority of women (%) completing the interview had heard about the Study although there was some variation over time and across geographic segments visited.  Of those women, the majority (%) had heard about the Study from multiple sources.  Top sources of information about the Study included advanced mailings to households (%), billboards (%), print media (%), radio (%), and television (%). Implications: Outreach and engagement strategies used in this Study were effective in reaching the majority of potential Study participants.  Advanced direct mailing and billboards were the most effective strategies for publicizing information about the Study.  It is anticipated that future recruitment and retention of women and families in the Study will be highly dependent on the success of community outreach and engagement activities.en_GB
dc.subjectNational Children's Studyen_GB
dc.subjectCommunity knowledgeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:51Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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