2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211660
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PAIN, DEPRESSION, & QOL IN ADULTS WITH POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA WHO MEDITATE
Abstract:
Purpose: Participants assigned to the usual care group in a comparative study on mindfulness meditation in community dwelling older adults with postherpetic neuralgia were given an opportunity to complete the treatment protocol. Changes in pain, depression, and quality of life were examined. Background: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a severe, life altering condition that afflicts approximately 20-30% of individuals who have had shingles, has no known cure and may persist for months or even years. The primary cause of morbidity in PHN is pain; PHN is reportedly one of the most intractable neuropathic pain disorders. More than 50% of cases of shingles occur in individuals aged 50 or older, with risk of PHN increasing with age. The pain and stress of PHN has been associated with decreased quality of life, affecting ability to perform activities of daily living. The original pilot study determined that older adults were interested in mindfulness meditation as a way to help manage PHN, and positive trends were identified in the outcomes examined. Methods:  The original study used a mixed method, randomized pre-test/post-test repeated measures design to examine the effects of mindfulness meditation in community dwelling older adults with PHN. Data were collected at entry to the study (Time 1), at two weeks (Time 2), and at eight weeks (Time 3). After Time 2 testing, participants were randomly assigned to usual care or usual care plus meditation. Twelve of 14 eligible participants initially assigned to the usual care group chose to complete the treatment protocol after Time 3 testing. They followed the meditation protocol for six weeks, with final data collection (including interviews) at fourteen weeks (Time 4). Results: Mean age of the 12 participants was 75.6 years.  Nine (75%) participants were female, and 3 (25%) were male. Eight (67%) participants were white, 3 (25%) were Hispanic, and 1 (8%) was American Indian. At entry to the original study, 10 (83%) of these 12 participants had moderate or greater pain due to PHN at least 5 days per week, with 7 (58%) of the 12 participants describing their pain as severe or greater. Data Analysis: At completion of the treatment protocol (week 14) for the 12 study participants, significant differences for time effect (showing improvement) were found in the Physical Health Component score of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) (p=.02), Bodily Pain subscale of the MOS SF-36 (p=.02), and the Total Pain score of the McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form-2 (MPQ SF-2) (p=.02), using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Although not statistically significant, scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) improved over time. Implications: The majority of participants initially randomized to usual care were interested in learning the meditation protocol of the original pilot study. They were willing to complete the treatment protocol, meditate daily and record pain and fatigue levels in daily diaries. A larger study is planned, and will include individuals with additional persistent pain conditions.
Keywords:
Postherpetic neuralgia; Treatment; Meditation; Pain; Depression; Quality of life
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5682
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePAIN, DEPRESSION, & QOL IN ADULTS WITH POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA WHO MEDITATEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211660-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Participants assigned to the usual care group in a comparative study on mindfulness meditation in community dwelling older adults with postherpetic neuralgia were given an opportunity to complete the treatment protocol. Changes in pain, depression, and quality of life were examined. Background: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a severe, life altering condition that afflicts approximately 20-30% of individuals who have had shingles, has no known cure and may persist for months or even years. The primary cause of morbidity in PHN is pain; PHN is reportedly one of the most intractable neuropathic pain disorders. More than 50% of cases of shingles occur in individuals aged 50 or older, with risk of PHN increasing with age. The pain and stress of PHN has been associated with decreased quality of life, affecting ability to perform activities of daily living. The original pilot study determined that older adults were interested in mindfulness meditation as a way to help manage PHN, and positive trends were identified in the outcomes examined. Methods:  The original study used a mixed method, randomized pre-test/post-test repeated measures design to examine the effects of mindfulness meditation in community dwelling older adults with PHN. Data were collected at entry to the study (Time 1), at two weeks (Time 2), and at eight weeks (Time 3). After Time 2 testing, participants were randomly assigned to usual care or usual care plus meditation. Twelve of 14 eligible participants initially assigned to the usual care group chose to complete the treatment protocol after Time 3 testing. They followed the meditation protocol for six weeks, with final data collection (including interviews) at fourteen weeks (Time 4). Results: Mean age of the 12 participants was 75.6 years.  Nine (75%) participants were female, and 3 (25%) were male. Eight (67%) participants were white, 3 (25%) were Hispanic, and 1 (8%) was American Indian. At entry to the original study, 10 (83%) of these 12 participants had moderate or greater pain due to PHN at least 5 days per week, with 7 (58%) of the 12 participants describing their pain as severe or greater. Data Analysis: At completion of the treatment protocol (week 14) for the 12 study participants, significant differences for time effect (showing improvement) were found in the Physical Health Component score of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) (p=.02), Bodily Pain subscale of the MOS SF-36 (p=.02), and the Total Pain score of the McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form-2 (MPQ SF-2) (p=.02), using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Although not statistically significant, scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) improved over time. Implications: The majority of participants initially randomized to usual care were interested in learning the meditation protocol of the original pilot study. They were willing to complete the treatment protocol, meditate daily and record pain and fatigue levels in daily diaries. A larger study is planned, and will include individuals with additional persistent pain conditions.en_GB
dc.subjectPostherpetic neuralgiaen_GB
dc.subjectTreatmenten_GB
dc.subjectMeditationen_GB
dc.subjectPainen_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:54Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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