2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211661
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A PILOT COMPARISON OF TWO MASSAGE TECHNIQUES in FIBROMYALGIA
Abstract:
People with fibromyalgia (FM) have persistent widespread pain, axial pain, and tenderness. As an adjunct to drug therapies, nurses often recommend bodywork such as massage to reduce symptoms and optimize physical function. Light Swedish-type massage is most commonly selected as FM patients also experience tenderness to touch. Recently, however, the pain generating role of the fascia in maintaining FM symptoms has been demonstrated. Additionally, two randomized controlled trials of myofascial release therapy compared to sham ultrasound or disconnected magnotherapy resulted in superiority of MFR in the control of most FM symptoms (Castro-Sánchez et al., 2011a; Castro-Sánchez et al., 2011b). The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of deep myofascial release versus an active massage condition- light Swedish massage- in women with FM. Eight subjects received either myofasical release while four subjects received Swedish massage for 90 minutes weekly x four weeks. On average, the subjects were 34.5 years of age (SD=5.5), with FM for 2.6 years (SD=0.9), with no baseline differences between groups. The Aickin separation test (2004) indicated that primary outcome, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised Total Change Score for the myofascial group trended (mean = 10.14, SD = 16.2) in the hypothesized and positive direction compared to the Swedish massage group (mean = 0.33, SD = 4.93) (Aickin, 2004).  Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire-Revised scored pain at 7 bodily regions, with most improvement in neck/shoulder pain. Additionally qualitative interviews with the massage therapist will be conducted to further determine the tolerability of the interventions. There were no adverse events or early discontinuations by subjects indicating that both interventions were feasible and acceptable to patients despite tenderness to touch (baseline myalgic score 31.9 (SD=7.7)  and 36.3 (SD=3.1) in the myofascial and Swedish massage groups respectively. Larger randomized controlled trials are supported by the separation test.
Keywords:
Fibromyalgia; Massage
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4738
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA PILOT COMPARISON OF TWO MASSAGE TECHNIQUES in FIBROMYALGIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211661-
dc.description.abstractPeople with fibromyalgia (FM) have persistent widespread pain, axial pain, and tenderness. As an adjunct to drug therapies, nurses often recommend bodywork such as massage to reduce symptoms and optimize physical function. Light Swedish-type massage is most commonly selected as FM patients also experience tenderness to touch. Recently, however, the pain generating role of the fascia in maintaining FM symptoms has been demonstrated. Additionally, two randomized controlled trials of myofascial release therapy compared to sham ultrasound or disconnected magnotherapy resulted in superiority of MFR in the control of most FM symptoms (Castro-Sánchez et al., 2011a; Castro-Sánchez et al., 2011b). The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of deep myofascial release versus an active massage condition- light Swedish massage- in women with FM. Eight subjects received either myofasical release while four subjects received Swedish massage for 90 minutes weekly x four weeks. On average, the subjects were 34.5 years of age (SD=5.5), with FM for 2.6 years (SD=0.9), with no baseline differences between groups. The Aickin separation test (2004) indicated that primary outcome, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised Total Change Score for the myofascial group trended (mean = 10.14, SD = 16.2) in the hypothesized and positive direction compared to the Swedish massage group (mean = 0.33, SD = 4.93) (Aickin, 2004).  Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire-Revised scored pain at 7 bodily regions, with most improvement in neck/shoulder pain. Additionally qualitative interviews with the massage therapist will be conducted to further determine the tolerability of the interventions. There were no adverse events or early discontinuations by subjects indicating that both interventions were feasible and acceptable to patients despite tenderness to touch (baseline myalgic score 31.9 (SD=7.7)  and 36.3 (SD=3.1) in the myofascial and Swedish massage groups respectively. Larger randomized controlled trials are supported by the separation test.en_GB
dc.subjectFibromyalgiaen_GB
dc.subjectMassageen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:06:58Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:06:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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