THE IMPACT OF A POVERTY SIMULATION on NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211666
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE IMPACT OF A POVERTY SIMULATION on NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTY
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims.  The purpose of this comparative study was to determine the impact of a poverty simulation on undergraduate nursing students’ attitudes towards poverty and their understanding of the link between poverty and health. Rationale/Background.  Poverty estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey show that poverty rates have increased in the United States from 13.2% in 2008 to 14.3% in 2009.  Poverty is one of the social determinants of health.   In order to deliver patient-centered care, it is important for nurses to have an understanding of the impact of poverty on health-related decisions. Methods. A three-hour poverty simulation was developed by the Missouri Association for Community Action to educate and sensitize participants to the realities of living with poverty.  Five cohorts of junior baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a populations course participated in the study; two of the cohorts participated in the poverty simulation and three did not. In addition to demographic information, a 21-item The Attitudes Towards Poverty Short Form (ATP-S) questionnaire was administered before the simulation and six weeks after.  The ATP-S has demonstrated psychometric validity and is a 5-point Likert scale, with each item scored on a scale from 1-5.  A global score of a range of 21- 105 is obtained by summing the item scores; higher scores indicate more positive attitudes towards poverty.  Three subscales have been identified:  Personal deficiency, stigma, and structural perspective.  Assessments of students’ beliefs about the link between poverty and health were also collected. Results. 178 nursing students participated in the study; 75 in the control group and 103 in the experimental group.  Pre-test scores were higher for the experimental than the control group; this was related to the differences between the two groups.  A higher pre-test global score was positively correlated with no religious affiliation (Pearson correlation, .290, p.=.000), prior poverty exposure (Pearson correlation, .292, p.=.000); and liberal political views (Pearson correlation, .454, p.=.000). Controlling for pretest group differences, posttest means for the experimental group (78.73) were 3.5 points higher than for the control group (75.72), which was significant at .007. Changes in posttest scores was attributed for the experimental group to growth in the personal deficiency and structural perspective subscales.    There was also a significant association between the simulation and participants’ beliefs about the link between poverty and health due to living conditions (a structural perspective) rather than behavior, drifting into poverty, or no link (chi square = 14.1, p=.003). Implications.  After the simulation, nursing students viewed poverty more from a structural perspective and less from a behavioral viewpoint.  The poverty simulation is a unique, engaging learning experience that has positive impact on nursing students’ attitudes towards poverty. This simulation can provide an opportunity for students to gain sensitivity for working with this increasing population.
Keywords:
Nursing students; Attitudes, practice; Health and poverty
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4412
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF A POVERTY SIMULATION on NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211666-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims.  The purpose of this comparative study was to determine the impact of a poverty simulation on undergraduate nursing students’ attitudes towards poverty and their understanding of the link between poverty and health. Rationale/Background.  Poverty estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey show that poverty rates have increased in the United States from 13.2% in 2008 to 14.3% in 2009.  Poverty is one of the social determinants of health.   In order to deliver patient-centered care, it is important for nurses to have an understanding of the impact of poverty on health-related decisions. Methods. A three-hour poverty simulation was developed by the Missouri Association for Community Action to educate and sensitize participants to the realities of living with poverty.  Five cohorts of junior baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a populations course participated in the study; two of the cohorts participated in the poverty simulation and three did not. In addition to demographic information, a 21-item The Attitudes Towards Poverty Short Form (ATP-S) questionnaire was administered before the simulation and six weeks after.  The ATP-S has demonstrated psychometric validity and is a 5-point Likert scale, with each item scored on a scale from 1-5.  A global score of a range of 21- 105 is obtained by summing the item scores; higher scores indicate more positive attitudes towards poverty.  Three subscales have been identified:  Personal deficiency, stigma, and structural perspective.  Assessments of students’ beliefs about the link between poverty and health were also collected. Results. 178 nursing students participated in the study; 75 in the control group and 103 in the experimental group.  Pre-test scores were higher for the experimental than the control group; this was related to the differences between the two groups.  A higher pre-test global score was positively correlated with no religious affiliation (Pearson correlation, .290, p.=.000), prior poverty exposure (Pearson correlation, .292, p.=.000); and liberal political views (Pearson correlation, .454, p.=.000). Controlling for pretest group differences, posttest means for the experimental group (78.73) were 3.5 points higher than for the control group (75.72), which was significant at .007. Changes in posttest scores was attributed for the experimental group to growth in the personal deficiency and structural perspective subscales.    There was also a significant association between the simulation and participants’ beliefs about the link between poverty and health due to living conditions (a structural perspective) rather than behavior, drifting into poverty, or no link (chi square = 14.1, p=.003). Implications.  After the simulation, nursing students viewed poverty more from a structural perspective and less from a behavioral viewpoint.  The poverty simulation is a unique, engaging learning experience that has positive impact on nursing students’ attitudes towards poverty. This simulation can provide an opportunity for students to gain sensitivity for working with this increasing population.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectAttitudes, practiceen_GB
dc.subjectHealth and povertyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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