2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211668
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, AND QUALITY OF LIFE in YOUTH WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE
Abstract:
PURPOSE/AIMS: The specific aims of the study were to 1) examine depression, anxiety, and quality of life and 2) describe the relationships among them in sickle cell disease (SCD). RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The chronic nature of SCD puts children and adolescents at risk for anxiety and depression because of the recurrent painful exacerbations or crises.  Studies suggest that those with SCD may be at risk for impaired psychosocial functioning and reduced quality of life.  However, little is known about how depression and anxiety impact their quality of life. METHODS: As part of the “Wireless Pain Intervention Program”, participants completed questionnaires that included Revised Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) and Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL). Participants in the study had: 1) diagnosis of SCD, 2) age 10 to 17 years, 3) ability to read, write, and understand English.   Data were collected in sites arranged by Sickle Cell Disease Foundation of California. RESULTS: Children (n=44; 58.7%; mean age 11.6 ± 1.1 years) and adolescents (n=31; 41.3%; mean age 14.9 ± 0.9 years) were males (n=37; 49.3%), females (n=38; 50.7%), had HgbSS (n=35; 46.7%), HgbSC, (n=23; 30.7%), and others unknown (n=17; 22.6%).  They had acute pain episodes requiring hospitalization from 0 to 3 times per year (n=35; 46.7%) to more than 3 times per year (n=40; 53.3%).  Some participants reported symptoms of generalized anxiety (n=5; 6.7%), major depression (n=8; 10.7%), obsessive compulsion (n=7; 9.3%), panic disorder (n=9; 12.0%), social phobia (n=2; 2.7%), and separation anxiety (n=8; 10.7%).  Their t-scores were greater than the 65% threshold (DSM IV-R criteria) on the corresponding RCADS subscales.  No age and gender differences were found in these scores.  Total mean quality of life (PedsQL) scores was 74.7 ± 14.8 on 0 to 100 scale (range 34.8 to 100), and about one third (31.3%) had low scores (<70) indicating poor quality of life.  The subscale scores for the different dimensions of QOL were low:  1) psychosocial health (73.3 ± 15.9), 2) emotional (75.0 ± 20.7), 3) social (80.8 ±19.1), 4) school functioning (64.0 19.8), 5 and) physical (77.4 ± 17.4).  No age and gender differences were found in these scores.  Significant negative correlations (p < 0.0001) were found between mean total QOL scores and symptoms of 1) general anxiety (r = -0.51), 2) depression (r = -0.66), 3) obsessive compulsive (r = -0.53), 4) panic (r = - 0.60), and 5) social phobia (r = - 0.57). IMPLICATIONS: Adolescents with SCD are at risk for anxiety, depression, and other associated psychosocial distress that may affect quality of life.  While clinicians primarily focus on treatment of physical symptoms (pain, respiratory, abdominal symptoms, etc.) or disease management (hydroxyurea, blood transfusions), little attention is made with assessment and management of psychosocial needs.  Psychosocial assessment to screen, detect, and treat mental health distress is warranted.  Future research is needed to examine interventions that will address not only the physical, but also the psychosocial needs (eg anxiety, depression) of children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, and improve quality of life in this population.
Keywords:
Sickle cell; Depression; Quality of Life
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4771
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDEPRESSION, ANXIETY, AND QUALITY OF LIFE in YOUTH WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211668-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/AIMS: The specific aims of the study were to 1) examine depression, anxiety, and quality of life and 2) describe the relationships among them in sickle cell disease (SCD). RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The chronic nature of SCD puts children and adolescents at risk for anxiety and depression because of the recurrent painful exacerbations or crises.  Studies suggest that those with SCD may be at risk for impaired psychosocial functioning and reduced quality of life.  However, little is known about how depression and anxiety impact their quality of life. METHODS: As part of the “Wireless Pain Intervention Program”, participants completed questionnaires that included Revised Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) and Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL). Participants in the study had: 1) diagnosis of SCD, 2) age 10 to 17 years, 3) ability to read, write, and understand English.   Data were collected in sites arranged by Sickle Cell Disease Foundation of California. RESULTS: Children (n=44; 58.7%; mean age 11.6 ± 1.1 years) and adolescents (n=31; 41.3%; mean age 14.9 ± 0.9 years) were males (n=37; 49.3%), females (n=38; 50.7%), had HgbSS (n=35; 46.7%), HgbSC, (n=23; 30.7%), and others unknown (n=17; 22.6%).  They had acute pain episodes requiring hospitalization from 0 to 3 times per year (n=35; 46.7%) to more than 3 times per year (n=40; 53.3%).  Some participants reported symptoms of generalized anxiety (n=5; 6.7%), major depression (n=8; 10.7%), obsessive compulsion (n=7; 9.3%), panic disorder (n=9; 12.0%), social phobia (n=2; 2.7%), and separation anxiety (n=8; 10.7%).  Their t-scores were greater than the 65% threshold (DSM IV-R criteria) on the corresponding RCADS subscales.  No age and gender differences were found in these scores.  Total mean quality of life (PedsQL) scores was 74.7 ± 14.8 on 0 to 100 scale (range 34.8 to 100), and about one third (31.3%) had low scores (<70) indicating poor quality of life.  The subscale scores for the different dimensions of QOL were low:  1) psychosocial health (73.3 ± 15.9), 2) emotional (75.0 ± 20.7), 3) social (80.8 ±19.1), 4) school functioning (64.0 19.8), 5 and) physical (77.4 ± 17.4).  No age and gender differences were found in these scores.  Significant negative correlations (p < 0.0001) were found between mean total QOL scores and symptoms of 1) general anxiety (r = -0.51), 2) depression (r = -0.66), 3) obsessive compulsive (r = -0.53), 4) panic (r = - 0.60), and 5) social phobia (r = - 0.57). IMPLICATIONS: Adolescents with SCD are at risk for anxiety, depression, and other associated psychosocial distress that may affect quality of life.  While clinicians primarily focus on treatment of physical symptoms (pain, respiratory, abdominal symptoms, etc.) or disease management (hydroxyurea, blood transfusions), little attention is made with assessment and management of psychosocial needs.  Psychosocial assessment to screen, detect, and treat mental health distress is warranted.  Future research is needed to examine interventions that will address not only the physical, but also the psychosocial needs (eg anxiety, depression) of children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, and improve quality of life in this population.en_GB
dc.subjectSickle cellen_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:22Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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