2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211670
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RESPONSES OF RN TO BSN STUDENTS TO REFLECTIVE ASSIGNMENTS
Abstract:
Purpose: This study will explore responses of RN to BSN students in a Community/Psychiatric/Mental Health Practice clinical course to the assignment “reflect on your practice.”  This is a preliminary inquiry to explore the meaning and practice of reflection in nursing education.  Using mixed methods, students’ perceptions of how they operationalize “reflect on practice” will be explored in surveys and interviews. In addition, students’ written reflective journals will be examined for themes or patterns. Background:  Nurse educators are charged with encouraging and teaching reflection on practice as a component of professional nursing behavior.  The most recent iteration of the AACN Baccalaureate Essentials includes reflection on practice in all nursing competencies.  Definitions of professionalism include reflection as essential to growth and the ability to improve upon practice. Yet there is little formal agreement among nurse educators about how to elicit or evaluate reflection. Nurse educators report intuitive or tacit understandings of what constitutes deep reflection, yet often are unable to clearly articulate what they expect in responses from students beyond, “I know it when I see it”.  International nursing and education scholars describe various models for assessing reflection and point out that ethical evaluation of reflection can be problematic. Methods: After institutional review board approval, 10 students will be surveyed anonymously using an electronic emailed structured questionnaire with 2 open ended questions and several likert scale type questions about students’ perceptions of reflection on practice. Then, a small subset of the students choosing to respond to the survey will be interviewed. Additionally, written structured reflective assignments from an RN-BSN Community/Psychiatric/Mental Health clinical course will be analyzed for themes and levels of reflection by four experienced nurse educators for depth of reflection and linkages to transforming practice. Results:  Anticipate completion February 2012. Implications:  Expected implications include increased clarity about students’ perceptions of reflection and better understandings for nurse educators on how to elicit and evaluate reflection. This pilot study is expected to inform the researchers’ future direction and methods in regards to reflection and nursing pedagogy.
Keywords:
Reflection; Nurse education
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4777
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRESPONSES OF RN TO BSN STUDENTS TO REFLECTIVE ASSIGNMENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211670-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study will explore responses of RN to BSN students in a Community/Psychiatric/Mental Health Practice clinical course to the assignment “reflect on your practice.”  This is a preliminary inquiry to explore the meaning and practice of reflection in nursing education.  Using mixed methods, students’ perceptions of how they operationalize “reflect on practice” will be explored in surveys and interviews. In addition, students’ written reflective journals will be examined for themes or patterns. Background:  Nurse educators are charged with encouraging and teaching reflection on practice as a component of professional nursing behavior.  The most recent iteration of the AACN Baccalaureate Essentials includes reflection on practice in all nursing competencies.  Definitions of professionalism include reflection as essential to growth and the ability to improve upon practice. Yet there is little formal agreement among nurse educators about how to elicit or evaluate reflection. Nurse educators report intuitive or tacit understandings of what constitutes deep reflection, yet often are unable to clearly articulate what they expect in responses from students beyond, “I know it when I see it”.  International nursing and education scholars describe various models for assessing reflection and point out that ethical evaluation of reflection can be problematic. Methods: After institutional review board approval, 10 students will be surveyed anonymously using an electronic emailed structured questionnaire with 2 open ended questions and several likert scale type questions about students’ perceptions of reflection on practice. Then, a small subset of the students choosing to respond to the survey will be interviewed. Additionally, written structured reflective assignments from an RN-BSN Community/Psychiatric/Mental Health clinical course will be analyzed for themes and levels of reflection by four experienced nurse educators for depth of reflection and linkages to transforming practice. Results:  Anticipate completion February 2012. Implications:  Expected implications include increased clarity about students’ perceptions of reflection and better understandings for nurse educators on how to elicit and evaluate reflection. This pilot study is expected to inform the researchers’ future direction and methods in regards to reflection and nursing pedagogy.en_GB
dc.subjectReflectionen_GB
dc.subjectNurse educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:30Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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