2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211672
Type:
Research Study
Title:
REDUCING CHILDHOOD OBESITY AMONG WIC RECIPIENTS
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this R21 study is to determine the impact of an intervention delivered in neighborhood Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics on childhood obesity (BMI> 95 percent for age and sex) in 2-4 year old children. Conceptual Framework: The study is based on the Ecological Model of Growth, which views obesity as resulting from interactions from the food the child eats, the child’s activity level, the interaction between the child and family members, and the child’s home environment. The variables of dietary intake, food availability, child’s hours of screen time, stimulation in home, parental feeding style, acculturation of the parents, and the safety of the neighborhood environment were all examined for their influence on child’s BMI after the 6 month intervention. Methods: The subjects were obtained from WIC waiting rooms, consented, and then randomly assigned to receive the intervention or standard WIC nutrition education. The sample size was planned to be 100 but due to natural disasters, the final sample size was 55 (control 33, intervention 22). The intervention was delivered in a series of 6 classes at the WIC clinics when the mothers of the children in the study were present for nutrition education or to pick up their food vouchers. The classes covered the following content: reading food labels, identifying appropriate types and amounts of food for preschooler, feeding picky eaters, basics of temperament, showing affection other than through food, ways to cook healthier food, how to be active when staying indoors, limiting screen time to 1 hour, appropriate ways to discipline preschoolers, and the importance of regular meal times and eating as a family. The children were weighed and measured for length every six months for 1 year to determine their BMI (baseline, at the completion of the intervention, and six months after the completion of the intervention). Results: Data are being analyzed at this time. Results will be presented at the conference. Implications:Childhood obesity is increasing in prevalence and severity. It is vital to access families of young children to help them with correct nutrition and parenting information so they can help their children avoid continuing to be obese as they become older children. When nurses work with families through common nutritional programs like WIC, they can have a strong impact on the future health of children in the nation.
Keywords:
Obesity; Childhood; Nutrition; Women
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4798
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleREDUCING CHILDHOOD OBESITY AMONG WIC RECIPIENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211672-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of this R21 study is to determine the impact of an intervention delivered in neighborhood Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics on childhood obesity (BMI> 95 percent for age and sex) in 2-4 year old children. Conceptual Framework: The study is based on the Ecological Model of Growth, which views obesity as resulting from interactions from the food the child eats, the child’s activity level, the interaction between the child and family members, and the child’s home environment. The variables of dietary intake, food availability, child’s hours of screen time, stimulation in home, parental feeding style, acculturation of the parents, and the safety of the neighborhood environment were all examined for their influence on child’s BMI after the 6 month intervention. Methods: The subjects were obtained from WIC waiting rooms, consented, and then randomly assigned to receive the intervention or standard WIC nutrition education. The sample size was planned to be 100 but due to natural disasters, the final sample size was 55 (control 33, intervention 22). The intervention was delivered in a series of 6 classes at the WIC clinics when the mothers of the children in the study were present for nutrition education or to pick up their food vouchers. The classes covered the following content: reading food labels, identifying appropriate types and amounts of food for preschooler, feeding picky eaters, basics of temperament, showing affection other than through food, ways to cook healthier food, how to be active when staying indoors, limiting screen time to 1 hour, appropriate ways to discipline preschoolers, and the importance of regular meal times and eating as a family. The children were weighed and measured for length every six months for 1 year to determine their BMI (baseline, at the completion of the intervention, and six months after the completion of the intervention). Results: Data are being analyzed at this time. Results will be presented at the conference. Implications:Childhood obesity is increasing in prevalence and severity. It is vital to access families of young children to help them with correct nutrition and parenting information so they can help their children avoid continuing to be obese as they become older children. When nurses work with families through common nutritional programs like WIC, they can have a strong impact on the future health of children in the nation.en_GB
dc.subjectObesityen_GB
dc.subjectChildhooden_GB
dc.subjectNutritionen_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:36Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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