2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211673
Type:
Research Study
Title:
VERIFICATION OF MAMMOGRAPHY UPTAKE AMONG KOREAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: To examine self-reported bias in mammography screening rates among Korean American (KA) women and compare beliefs between women of those for whom we were able to verify mammography uptakes and those for whom we could not verify uptakes. Rationale/Background: It is well known that women from ethnic minority groups tend to over-report mammography uptake, but actual mammography uptake rates compared to self-reports among KA women have not been reported in the literature. It would be necessary to explore whether any beliefs based on the Health Belief Model are related to verification rate. Methods: Mammography rates were verified among KA women who participated in our randomized clinical trial, Korean Immigrants & Mammography—Culture-specific Health Intervention (KIM—CHI) at 15-months post-baseline. All KA women who reported having had a mammography during the study period, in both intervention and control groups, were asked to sign a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) notification which they mailed to us if they agreed that we could verify their mammography uptakes. Results: Out of 395 women who participated in the 15-months post-baseline data collection, 192 reported having a mammogram during the study period. Of those, 12 women refused to let us verify their mammography uptake and 22 women reported that they had had a mammogram in Korea, but it was not possible for us to verify those. Of the 158 women to whom we mailed HIPAA forms, 106 mailed back signed forms (67% return rate). Of those 106 women, we were able to verify 92 mammography uptakes with physicians or mammography facilities (87% verification rate). We did not find any differences in variables of sociodemographic and health beliefs between the two groups. Implications: Even though we had an 87% verification rate among KA women who returned the HIPAA form, we speculate that the 33% who did not return signed HIPAA forms over-reported their mammography uptake. Verifying mammography uptakes from an ethnically minority group such KA women, who tend to not have regular physicians or places for health care, was challenging. Suggestions for future studies will be discussed.
Keywords:
Korean-American; Women; Mammography
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4805
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleVERIFICATION OF MAMMOGRAPHY UPTAKE AMONG KOREAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211673-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: To examine self-reported bias in mammography screening rates among Korean American (KA) women and compare beliefs between women of those for whom we were able to verify mammography uptakes and those for whom we could not verify uptakes. Rationale/Background: It is well known that women from ethnic minority groups tend to over-report mammography uptake, but actual mammography uptake rates compared to self-reports among KA women have not been reported in the literature. It would be necessary to explore whether any beliefs based on the Health Belief Model are related to verification rate. Methods: Mammography rates were verified among KA women who participated in our randomized clinical trial, Korean Immigrants & Mammography—Culture-specific Health Intervention (KIM—CHI) at 15-months post-baseline. All KA women who reported having had a mammography during the study period, in both intervention and control groups, were asked to sign a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) notification which they mailed to us if they agreed that we could verify their mammography uptakes. Results: Out of 395 women who participated in the 15-months post-baseline data collection, 192 reported having a mammogram during the study period. Of those, 12 women refused to let us verify their mammography uptake and 22 women reported that they had had a mammogram in Korea, but it was not possible for us to verify those. Of the 158 women to whom we mailed HIPAA forms, 106 mailed back signed forms (67% return rate). Of those 106 women, we were able to verify 92 mammography uptakes with physicians or mammography facilities (87% verification rate). We did not find any differences in variables of sociodemographic and health beliefs between the two groups. Implications: Even though we had an 87% verification rate among KA women who returned the HIPAA form, we speculate that the 33% who did not return signed HIPAA forms over-reported their mammography uptake. Verifying mammography uptakes from an ethnically minority group such KA women, who tend to not have regular physicians or places for health care, was challenging. Suggestions for future studies will be discussed.en_GB
dc.subjectKorean-Americanen_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.subjectMammographyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:40Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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