THE EFFECT OF INCENTIVES ON MODERATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN SEDENTARY OLDER ADULTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211674
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE EFFECT OF INCENTIVES ON MODERATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN SEDENTARY OLDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: This study evaluates the feasibility, acceptability and effect of a contingency management intervention on physical activity (PA) levels among a group of community-dwelling older adults. Rationale: Despite the well known benefits of PA for older adults, only 27% of men and 19% of older women engage in PA at the recommended levels. In many behavioral intervention research studies, older adults increase their activity, but still do not achieve recommended levels of 150 minutes/week or more of moderate-intensity activity. In fact, most PA intervention researchers prescribe less than the recommended amount to older adults in their studies. This may be in part due to researcher concerns about recruitment and retention when interventions are too demanding for participants. Contingency management–based interventions are among the most powerful behavior change strategies available. These interventions deliver an incentive contingent on the initiation or completion of a specified behavior. The strategy of providing modest financial incentives in a contingency management protocol to increase PA is endorsed by older adults. However, to date we have limited information on the efficacy of contingency management to promote activity among this population. This pilot study evaluates a new approach to the problem of physical inactivity and tests the hypotheses that sedentary older adults who receive a contingency management intervention will increase 1) objectively measured and 2) self-reported moderate PA over time. We also sought to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention components. Methods: A single group repeated measures design with baseline and weekly follow-up for four weeks was used to determine changes in PA over time in 7 physically inactive or underactive older adults. Participants wore an accelerometer at all times when awake. Accelerometer and self-reported PA data were collected weekly. Participants who had accelerometer results of 30 minutes of moderate activity on 5 days per week or more received a monetary incentive. Acceptability and feasibility were evaluated with a researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results: Based on accelerometer measurement, five of the seven participants met or exceeded PA guidelines during all 4 weeks of the study, one met recommendations for 3 of 4 weeks and one was active for 15-30 minute 5 days/week or more. Participants significantly increased their weekly self-reported moderate activity (F = 4.6; p = .046) over time. Accelerometer-measured minutes spent at moderate PA also increased (F = 3.50; p = .023) as did weekly energy expenditure of moderate activity (F = 9.92; p < .005) over time. The intervention was found to be acceptable and feasible. Implications: The project provides initial support for the hypothesis that incentives can increase moderate PA and serves as a basis for a larger study.
Keywords:
Elderly; Physical activity
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4814
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF INCENTIVES ON MODERATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN SEDENTARY OLDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211674-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: This study evaluates the feasibility, acceptability and effect of a contingency management intervention on physical activity (PA) levels among a group of community-dwelling older adults. Rationale: Despite the well known benefits of PA for older adults, only 27% of men and 19% of older women engage in PA at the recommended levels. In many behavioral intervention research studies, older adults increase their activity, but still do not achieve recommended levels of 150 minutes/week or more of moderate-intensity activity. In fact, most PA intervention researchers prescribe less than the recommended amount to older adults in their studies. This may be in part due to researcher concerns about recruitment and retention when interventions are too demanding for participants. Contingency management–based interventions are among the most powerful behavior change strategies available. These interventions deliver an incentive contingent on the initiation or completion of a specified behavior. The strategy of providing modest financial incentives in a contingency management protocol to increase PA is endorsed by older adults. However, to date we have limited information on the efficacy of contingency management to promote activity among this population. This pilot study evaluates a new approach to the problem of physical inactivity and tests the hypotheses that sedentary older adults who receive a contingency management intervention will increase 1) objectively measured and 2) self-reported moderate PA over time. We also sought to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention components. Methods: A single group repeated measures design with baseline and weekly follow-up for four weeks was used to determine changes in PA over time in 7 physically inactive or underactive older adults. Participants wore an accelerometer at all times when awake. Accelerometer and self-reported PA data were collected weekly. Participants who had accelerometer results of 30 minutes of moderate activity on 5 days per week or more received a monetary incentive. Acceptability and feasibility were evaluated with a researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results: Based on accelerometer measurement, five of the seven participants met or exceeded PA guidelines during all 4 weeks of the study, one met recommendations for 3 of 4 weeks and one was active for 15-30 minute 5 days/week or more. Participants significantly increased their weekly self-reported moderate activity (F = 4.6; p = .046) over time. Accelerometer-measured minutes spent at moderate PA also increased (F = 3.50; p = .023) as did weekly energy expenditure of moderate activity (F = 9.92; p < .005) over time. The intervention was found to be acceptable and feasible. Implications: The project provides initial support for the hypothesis that incentives can increase moderate PA and serves as a basis for a larger study.en_GB
dc.subjectElderlyen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:43Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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