2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211675
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SIGN CHI DO EXERCISE IMPROVES FUNCTIONAL FITNESS IN OLDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effect of a low intensity Sign Chi Do (SCD) exercise intervention on selected field measures of functional fitness in older adults currently not participating in balance, strength or flexibility training. SCD is an innovative exercise that incorporates diaphragmatic breathing, choreographed sign gestures, meditation, and music to create harmony between the mind and body. Rationale/Background: National guidelines recommend older adults participate in strength training at least 2 days per week plus balance and flexibility training. Functional fitness components necessary for older adults to perform everyday activities safely and independently without undue fatigue include balance, strength, and flexibility training. However, over 80 % of all older adults fail to do so. SCD includes the fitness components described. A previous RCT demonstrated SCD participants significantly improved balance and endurance compared to a sedentary control group (N = 49). There is no evidence of the effect of SCD on strength or flexibility. Methods: A pre-test/post-test single group design was used to test the effect of a 12 week SCD exercise intervention on upper and lower body strength (arm curls and chair stands; balance (Timed Up & Go and One-leg stance), and flexibility (back scratch). Results:  Five community dwelling older adults (age range 61 to 80 years) with a history of cardiovascular disease and arthritis; and not currently participating in strength, flexibility, or balance training, completed the study. Strength scores improved by at least 2 arm curls or chair stands for those at risk for loss of physical function. Most transitioned from the 25th to the 50th percentile according to age and gender from pre to post intervention. Timed Up & Go scores improved by an average of 3.83 (range 1.98-4.98) seconds for those at risk for falls. All flexibility scores were high at baseline and remained in the upper 75th percentile. Implications: While underpowered to conduct any statistical analysis, the participants demonstrated clinical improvement in balance and strength. Continued practice of this innovative, low intensity exercise called SCD has the potential to improve functional fitness for older adults.
Keywords:
Elderly; Physical activity
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4829
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSIGN CHI DO EXERCISE IMPROVES FUNCTIONAL FITNESS IN OLDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211675-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effect of a low intensity Sign Chi Do (SCD) exercise intervention on selected field measures of functional fitness in older adults currently not participating in balance, strength or flexibility training. SCD is an innovative exercise that incorporates diaphragmatic breathing, choreographed sign gestures, meditation, and music to create harmony between the mind and body. Rationale/Background: National guidelines recommend older adults participate in strength training at least 2 days per week plus balance and flexibility training. Functional fitness components necessary for older adults to perform everyday activities safely and independently without undue fatigue include balance, strength, and flexibility training. However, over 80 % of all older adults fail to do so. SCD includes the fitness components described. A previous RCT demonstrated SCD participants significantly improved balance and endurance compared to a sedentary control group (N = 49). There is no evidence of the effect of SCD on strength or flexibility. Methods: A pre-test/post-test single group design was used to test the effect of a 12 week SCD exercise intervention on upper and lower body strength (arm curls and chair stands; balance (Timed Up & Go and One-leg stance), and flexibility (back scratch). Results:  Five community dwelling older adults (age range 61 to 80 years) with a history of cardiovascular disease and arthritis; and not currently participating in strength, flexibility, or balance training, completed the study. Strength scores improved by at least 2 arm curls or chair stands for those at risk for loss of physical function. Most transitioned from the 25th to the 50th percentile according to age and gender from pre to post intervention. Timed Up & Go scores improved by an average of 3.83 (range 1.98-4.98) seconds for those at risk for falls. All flexibility scores were high at baseline and remained in the upper 75th percentile. Implications: While underpowered to conduct any statistical analysis, the participants demonstrated clinical improvement in balance and strength. Continued practice of this innovative, low intensity exercise called SCD has the potential to improve functional fitness for older adults.en_GB
dc.subjectElderlyen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:47Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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