FEASIBILITY AND IMPACT OF A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION FOR OLDER HISPANIC WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211676
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FEASIBILITY AND IMPACT OF A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION FOR OLDER HISPANIC WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose: Evaluation of intervention feasibility and impact can help to determine when behavioral change interventions should be recommended for efficacy testing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of a Wellness Motivation Intervention (WMI) designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women. Rationale: Recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA) emphasize physical activity as a priority in preventing disease and disability among older adults. Moderate intensity physical activity has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk in older adults. Older adults are the least physically active of any age group; one-third report no physical activity. Older Hispanic women are at highest cardiovascular risk due to overweight, obesity, hypertension, and Type 2 diabetes, yet 64% report no physical activity. Evaluation of the feasibility and impact of interventions designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women is essential. Methods: A randomized experimental design was used with 1 between factor (WMI, Attention Control (AC)) and 1 within factor (baseline, 12 weeks). Evaluation of intervention feasibility included: acceptability, demand, fidelity records to assess implementation and practicality; adaptation, integration, and expansion. To evaluate WMI impact, the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire and pedometers measured time spent in physical activity and steps per day; RMANOVA compared outcomes in WMI and AC groups. Results: Hispanic women (N = 60) age 50 to 87 years old were randomized to WMI and AC groups. The 12 week WMI was found to be “very acceptable” (M = 3.64, SD = 1) based on questionnaire responses and interventionist field notes. Attendance was high (68% to 100%) with 71.4% completing all 12 sessions, and attrition was low (<10%). The WMI was implemented as planned, with strong fidelity evaluation. Adaptation and expansion included WMI modifications to ensure cultural relevance and participant requests for WMI delivery. Integration evaluation supported the feasibility of the WMI. There was a significant change in time spent in physical activity between baseline and post intervention at 12 weeks (F1, 53 = 45.20, p ≤ .001, η2 = .46); this change over time differed by the WMI and AC groups (F1, 53 = 30.66, p ≤ .001, η2 = .37). There was no significant difference over time between the groups for pedometer steps. Implications: Recommendations for research on physical activity include identifying feasible interventions that can be built upon to extend the science for application to diverse settings. This randomized controlled trial provided initial support for the hypotheses that delivery of the WMI to older Hispanic women was feasible and would show a significant increase in physical activity. The results provide a beginning understanding of the effects of the intervention in promoting physical activity in older Hispanic women.
Keywords:
Elderly; Physical activity; Hispanic women
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4830
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFEASIBILITY AND IMPACT OF A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION FOR OLDER HISPANIC WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211676-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Evaluation of intervention feasibility and impact can help to determine when behavioral change interventions should be recommended for efficacy testing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of a Wellness Motivation Intervention (WMI) designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women. Rationale: Recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA) emphasize physical activity as a priority in preventing disease and disability among older adults. Moderate intensity physical activity has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk in older adults. Older adults are the least physically active of any age group; one-third report no physical activity. Older Hispanic women are at highest cardiovascular risk due to overweight, obesity, hypertension, and Type 2 diabetes, yet 64% report no physical activity. Evaluation of the feasibility and impact of interventions designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women is essential. Methods: A randomized experimental design was used with 1 between factor (WMI, Attention Control (AC)) and 1 within factor (baseline, 12 weeks). Evaluation of intervention feasibility included: acceptability, demand, fidelity records to assess implementation and practicality; adaptation, integration, and expansion. To evaluate WMI impact, the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire and pedometers measured time spent in physical activity and steps per day; RMANOVA compared outcomes in WMI and AC groups. Results: Hispanic women (N = 60) age 50 to 87 years old were randomized to WMI and AC groups. The 12 week WMI was found to be “very acceptable” (M = 3.64, SD = 1) based on questionnaire responses and interventionist field notes. Attendance was high (68% to 100%) with 71.4% completing all 12 sessions, and attrition was low (<10%). The WMI was implemented as planned, with strong fidelity evaluation. Adaptation and expansion included WMI modifications to ensure cultural relevance and participant requests for WMI delivery. Integration evaluation supported the feasibility of the WMI. There was a significant change in time spent in physical activity between baseline and post intervention at 12 weeks (F1, 53 = 45.20, p ≤ .001, η2 = .46); this change over time differed by the WMI and AC groups (F1, 53 = 30.66, p ≤ .001, η2 = .37). There was no significant difference over time between the groups for pedometer steps. Implications: Recommendations for research on physical activity include identifying feasible interventions that can be built upon to extend the science for application to diverse settings. This randomized controlled trial provided initial support for the hypotheses that delivery of the WMI to older Hispanic women was feasible and would show a significant increase in physical activity. The results provide a beginning understanding of the effects of the intervention in promoting physical activity in older Hispanic women.en_GB
dc.subjectElderlyen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.subjectHispanic womenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:07:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:07:50Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:07:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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