2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211679
Type:
Research Study
Title:
EMERGENCY NURSES' KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES ABOUT PAIN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore emergency nurses' understanding of pain and the medications used to treat pain. Rationale/Background: Pain is one of the most common reasons that patients present in the emergency department (ED). The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2011 Pain in America report was emphatic in its declaration that pain, especially chronic pain, is an undertreated condition in the U.S. across health care settings and providers. Although there is abundant literature with respect to patients’ experiences of pain and their preferences for and dissatisfaction with pain management, less is known about how providers, particularly Registered Nurses (RNs), make pain management decisions. Since a nurse’s knowledge and attitude toward pain informs how she/he manages a patient’s pain, an aim of the study was to measure emergency nurses’ knowledge and attitudes about pain. Methods: In a descriptive study design, data about emergency nurses’ knowledge and attitudes toward pain were gathered using Ferrell and McCaffery’s Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP).  The KASRP consists of 22 true and false questions, 13 multiple choice questions, and two case vignettes with two questions each. Emergency nurses completed the survey either electronically or in paper format and were given the ability to remain anonymous. Demographic data were collected about each participant’s race/ethnicity, age, gender, years as a nurse, highest level of education, and years of ED experience. Results: Ninety-one emergency nurses completed the survey. The mean total KASRP score was 76%. Participants taking the survey scored comparably or better than participants in other reported studies using the KASRP. No significant differences were found in mean total scores by age, education level, years of nursing experience, or years of ED experience. Years of nursing experience, whether or not in the emergency department was not correlated with correct responses. Eight questions were answered incorrectly by more than 50% of participants. Five of these questions were related to opioid pharmacology and dosage, two concerned understanding addiction and dependence, and one was linked to nurse assessment and patient report of pain level. Analysis of these eight questions revealed higher education levels to be positively associated with correct answers. Implications: This study’s findings underscore the IOM’s report that pain is a significant national problem, with most providers undertreating pain. There is a need for targeted education to emergency department nurses, especially with respect to opioid pharmacology and dosing, regardless of the nurse’s years of experience or education level. Nursing programs also need to increase curricular content on pain and pain management so new nurses are better prepared to enter the specialty of emergency nursing. Further research is needed to determine more about the processes nurses employ to make decisions about pain management.  
Keywords:
Emergency Nursing methods; nurses' perceptions of pain management
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4836
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleEMERGENCY NURSES' KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES ABOUT PAINen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211679-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore emergency nurses' understanding of pain and the medications used to treat pain. Rationale/Background: Pain is one of the most common reasons that patients present in the emergency department (ED). The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2011 Pain in America report was emphatic in its declaration that pain, especially chronic pain, is an undertreated condition in the U.S. across health care settings and providers. Although there is abundant literature with respect to patients’ experiences of pain and their preferences for and dissatisfaction with pain management, less is known about how providers, particularly Registered Nurses (RNs), make pain management decisions. Since a nurse’s knowledge and attitude toward pain informs how she/he manages a patient’s pain, an aim of the study was to measure emergency nurses’ knowledge and attitudes about pain. Methods: In a descriptive study design, data about emergency nurses’ knowledge and attitudes toward pain were gathered using Ferrell and McCaffery’s Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP).  The KASRP consists of 22 true and false questions, 13 multiple choice questions, and two case vignettes with two questions each. Emergency nurses completed the survey either electronically or in paper format and were given the ability to remain anonymous. Demographic data were collected about each participant’s race/ethnicity, age, gender, years as a nurse, highest level of education, and years of ED experience. Results: Ninety-one emergency nurses completed the survey. The mean total KASRP score was 76%. Participants taking the survey scored comparably or better than participants in other reported studies using the KASRP. No significant differences were found in mean total scores by age, education level, years of nursing experience, or years of ED experience. Years of nursing experience, whether or not in the emergency department was not correlated with correct responses. Eight questions were answered incorrectly by more than 50% of participants. Five of these questions were related to opioid pharmacology and dosage, two concerned understanding addiction and dependence, and one was linked to nurse assessment and patient report of pain level. Analysis of these eight questions revealed higher education levels to be positively associated with correct answers. Implications: This study’s findings underscore the IOM’s report that pain is a significant national problem, with most providers undertreating pain. There is a need for targeted education to emergency department nurses, especially with respect to opioid pharmacology and dosing, regardless of the nurse’s years of experience or education level. Nursing programs also need to increase curricular content on pain and pain management so new nurses are better prepared to enter the specialty of emergency nursing. Further research is needed to determine more about the processes nurses employ to make decisions about pain management.  en_GB
dc.subjectEmergency Nursing methodsen_GB
dc.subjectnurses' perceptions of pain managementen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:01Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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