2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211682
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FACTORS INFLUENCING PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN OLDER PREGNANT THAI WOMEN
Abstract:
Background: The societal change in Thailand has influenced individuals to marry later in life resulting in a rapid increase in the number of women becoming pregnant later than 35 years of age. Many perinatal complications may occur in older pregnant women. However, limited data exists for factors associated with poor maternal and infant outcomes in this vulnerable group. Purpose: To describe the relationship between personal factors, perceived benefits and barriers, self-efficacy, social support, and health promoting behaviors to perinatal outcomes in older Thai women. Methods: Pender's Health Promotion Model (2006) provided the theoretical framework for this descriptive correlational study. The sample was 142 pregnant women age 35 years or older who were attending antenatal clinics in 4 public hospitals in northeastern Thailand. Measurement instruments included the Personal Characteristics Questionnaire, Perceived Benefits and Perceived Barriers of Health Promoting Behaviors Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Interpersonal Relationship Inventory questionnaire, and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II scale. Maternal outcomes were obtained from medical records. Results: Gestational diabetes mellitus, premature labor, breech presentation, pregnancy-induced hypertension, premature rupture of membrane, and ante-partum hemorrhage were the most frequently reported problem outcomes. Education level, perceived benefits, perceived self-efficacy, and social support were significantly associated with health promoting behaviors. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, the findings revealed that 47.9% of the variance of health promoting behaviors can be accounted for by the linear combination of perceived self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and social support. A significant negative correlation was found between higher health promoting behaviors scores and risk for antepartum hemorrhage. Conclusions: The results suggest that older pregnant women who have a higher education level, higher self-efficacy, who perceive more benefits of health promoting behaviors, and have higher social support tend to have increased health promoting behaviors. Moreover, women with higher health promoting behavior scores have lower risk for antepartum hemorrhage. Implications: Creating interventions to enhance self-efficacy and social support combined with education about the benefits of health promoting behaviors may promote better pregnancy outcomes in this high-risk population. Future research needs to assess additional factors that may impact maternal outcomes in older pregnant Thai women.
Keywords:
Thailand; Infant outcomes; Older women
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4862
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS INFLUENCING PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN OLDER PREGNANT THAI WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211682-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The societal change in Thailand has influenced individuals to marry later in life resulting in a rapid increase in the number of women becoming pregnant later than 35 years of age. Many perinatal complications may occur in older pregnant women. However, limited data exists for factors associated with poor maternal and infant outcomes in this vulnerable group. Purpose: To describe the relationship between personal factors, perceived benefits and barriers, self-efficacy, social support, and health promoting behaviors to perinatal outcomes in older Thai women. Methods: Pender's Health Promotion Model (2006) provided the theoretical framework for this descriptive correlational study. The sample was 142 pregnant women age 35 years or older who were attending antenatal clinics in 4 public hospitals in northeastern Thailand. Measurement instruments included the Personal Characteristics Questionnaire, Perceived Benefits and Perceived Barriers of Health Promoting Behaviors Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Interpersonal Relationship Inventory questionnaire, and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II scale. Maternal outcomes were obtained from medical records. Results: Gestational diabetes mellitus, premature labor, breech presentation, pregnancy-induced hypertension, premature rupture of membrane, and ante-partum hemorrhage were the most frequently reported problem outcomes. Education level, perceived benefits, perceived self-efficacy, and social support were significantly associated with health promoting behaviors. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, the findings revealed that 47.9% of the variance of health promoting behaviors can be accounted for by the linear combination of perceived self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and social support. A significant negative correlation was found between higher health promoting behaviors scores and risk for antepartum hemorrhage. Conclusions: The results suggest that older pregnant women who have a higher education level, higher self-efficacy, who perceive more benefits of health promoting behaviors, and have higher social support tend to have increased health promoting behaviors. Moreover, women with higher health promoting behavior scores have lower risk for antepartum hemorrhage. Implications: Creating interventions to enhance self-efficacy and social support combined with education about the benefits of health promoting behaviors may promote better pregnancy outcomes in this high-risk population. Future research needs to assess additional factors that may impact maternal outcomes in older pregnant Thai women.en_GB
dc.subjectThailanden_GB
dc.subjectInfant outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectOlder womenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:12Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.