HORIZONTAL VIOLENCE AMONG HOSPITAL STAFF RNs AND THE QUALITY AND SAFETY OF PATIENT CARE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211683
Type:
Research Study
Title:
HORIZONTAL VIOLENCE AMONG HOSPITAL STAFF RNs AND THE QUALITY AND SAFETY OF PATIENT CARE
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: This study described hospital staff registered nurses’ (HSRNs) perception of their interactions and relationships with other HSRNs and quality of care. Three hypotheses based on a horizontal violence and quality and safety of patient care model were tested: (1) horizontal violence and peer relations are inversely related, (2) horizontal violence and the quality and safety of patient care are inversely related, and (3) horizontal violence and adverse events are positively related. Additionally, the relationship of nurse and work characteristics to horizontal violence, peer relations, and quality and safety were determined. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Horizontal violence is behavior directed between colleagues that disrespects and harms the receiver. Peer relations are the degree that peer relationships are supportive at work. Quality of care is the extent to which the care delivered to patients meets their needs. Patient safety is preventing and avoiding harm while delivering care. Adverse events are any action or lack of action that may result in patient injury. Researchers, clinicians, and nursing organizations agree that horizontal violence among nurses is a concern for them and potentially a patient safety threat. Some nurses suffer personal consequences from their experiences with horizontal violence including strained peer relationships. Others imply that horizontal violence jeopardizes patient safety. Yet no known empirical evidence exists that describes the relationship among horizontal violence, peer relations, and the quality and safety of patient care. Methods: A random sample of HSRNs (n=175) from the California Board of Registered Nursing’s mailing list was surveyed. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised measured horizontal violence, the peer relations subscale measured peer relations, and previous work was used to develop scales to measure quality and safety and adverse events. Bivariate and multivariate analyses tested study hypotheses. Results: Hypotheses were supported. Bivariate correlations showed an inverse relationship between horizontal violence and peer relationships (r= -.640; p = .000), an inverse relationship between horizontal violence and quality and safety (r= -.469; p= .000), and a positive relationship between horizontal violence and adverse events (r= .442; p=.000). In multivariate analyses controlling for nurse and work characteristics, horizontal violence contributed significantly in predicting peer relationships (unstandardized coefficients) (B = -1.084, p=.000), the quality and safety of patient care (B= -.672, p=.000), and adverse events (B= .428, p= .000).  When peer relations was added in the final step of the hierarchical regression model, findings suggested that peer relationships had a significant role  in the impact  horizontal violence had on quality and safety but not on adverse events. Nurse characteristics and hospital characteristics were not related to other variables. Clinical area contributed significantly in predicting the quality and safety of care and adverse events but not peer relationships. Implications: Horizontal violence among hospital staff nurses is critical to address because study findings indicate that just as nurses suffer consequences from their experiences with horizontal violence, patients may be impacted too. More research is needed to describe the relationship among horizontal violence, peer relations and quality and safety in different populations of staff nurses working in hospitals.
Keywords:
Hospital staff nurses; Registered nurses; Relationships, work
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4863
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleHORIZONTAL VIOLENCE AMONG HOSPITAL STAFF RNs AND THE QUALITY AND SAFETY OF PATIENT CAREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211683-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: This study described hospital staff registered nurses’ (HSRNs) perception of their interactions and relationships with other HSRNs and quality of care. Three hypotheses based on a horizontal violence and quality and safety of patient care model were tested: (1) horizontal violence and peer relations are inversely related, (2) horizontal violence and the quality and safety of patient care are inversely related, and (3) horizontal violence and adverse events are positively related. Additionally, the relationship of nurse and work characteristics to horizontal violence, peer relations, and quality and safety were determined. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Horizontal violence is behavior directed between colleagues that disrespects and harms the receiver. Peer relations are the degree that peer relationships are supportive at work. Quality of care is the extent to which the care delivered to patients meets their needs. Patient safety is preventing and avoiding harm while delivering care. Adverse events are any action or lack of action that may result in patient injury. Researchers, clinicians, and nursing organizations agree that horizontal violence among nurses is a concern for them and potentially a patient safety threat. Some nurses suffer personal consequences from their experiences with horizontal violence including strained peer relationships. Others imply that horizontal violence jeopardizes patient safety. Yet no known empirical evidence exists that describes the relationship among horizontal violence, peer relations, and the quality and safety of patient care. Methods: A random sample of HSRNs (n=175) from the California Board of Registered Nursing’s mailing list was surveyed. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised measured horizontal violence, the peer relations subscale measured peer relations, and previous work was used to develop scales to measure quality and safety and adverse events. Bivariate and multivariate analyses tested study hypotheses. Results: Hypotheses were supported. Bivariate correlations showed an inverse relationship between horizontal violence and peer relationships (r= -.640; p = .000), an inverse relationship between horizontal violence and quality and safety (r= -.469; p= .000), and a positive relationship between horizontal violence and adverse events (r= .442; p=.000). In multivariate analyses controlling for nurse and work characteristics, horizontal violence contributed significantly in predicting peer relationships (unstandardized coefficients) (B = -1.084, p=.000), the quality and safety of patient care (B= -.672, p=.000), and adverse events (B= .428, p= .000).  When peer relations was added in the final step of the hierarchical regression model, findings suggested that peer relationships had a significant role  in the impact  horizontal violence had on quality and safety but not on adverse events. Nurse characteristics and hospital characteristics were not related to other variables. Clinical area contributed significantly in predicting the quality and safety of care and adverse events but not peer relationships. Implications: Horizontal violence among hospital staff nurses is critical to address because study findings indicate that just as nurses suffer consequences from their experiences with horizontal violence, patients may be impacted too. More research is needed to describe the relationship among horizontal violence, peer relations and quality and safety in different populations of staff nurses working in hospitals.en_GB
dc.subjectHospital staff nursesen_GB
dc.subjectRegistered nursesen_GB
dc.subjectRelationships, worken_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:15Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.