2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211684
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TRAJECTORIES OF PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP QUALITY: PREDICTORS AND CONSEQUENCES
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims. To advance understanding of resilience processes essential to the promotion of healthy adolescent development, this study examined changes and stabilities in parent-child relationship quality (PCRQ). Study aims were to: (1) describe trajectories of PCRQ, defined in terms of relationship support and conflict; (2) examine the influence of adolescent and parent factors on PCRQ trajectory membership; and (3) test the effects of PCRQ trajectory membership on adolescent developmental outcomes (depression, high risk behavior). Background/Significance. Resilience theory, the conceptual basis for this research, posits that the interaction of risk factors (e.g., parent depression) and protective factors (e.g., relationship support and conflict) are processes central to adolescent adaptation. The resilience approach seeks to understand how protective factors influence or buffer the risks that adolescents experience, focusing away from the more limited deficit models used to describe adolescent problem behaviors and related developmental outcomes. Current research has uncovered compelling associations between maternal/parent depression and child developmental outcomes, but little is known about the effects of parent depression on longer-term relationship development and related outcomes. Few studies have examined the differentiation of parent-child relationship patterns across time; thus, little knowledge exists about predictors of PCRQ or its impact on child developmental outcomes, such as or adolescent depression and involvement in high risk behavior. Methods. Using data drawn from the PAYS study, the sample included youth (N=110) at risk for school failure or dropout and their parents (typically mothers).  Adolescent perception of PCRQ, measured in terms of perceived support and conflict, was assessed 5 times across a 2-year period. Predictor variables included child age, gender, and depression, and parent age, education level, and depression. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify trajectories of PCR support and conflict; multiple and multinomial regression were used to examine antecedents and consequences associated with the trajectories. Results.  For parent-child relationship support, a single class was the best fitting model. Child gender and depression (b=-1.13, b=-0.57) and parent depression and education (b=-1.16, b=-0.92) were significant predictors of PCR support.  PCR support predicted decreased youth depression (b=-0.09) and hopelessness (b=-0.09). For relationship conflict, three trajectories characterized the best fitting model: (1) low conflict, increasing across time, (2) high and decreasing, and (3) low and stable conflict. Child and parent factors did not predict membership in PCR conflict trajectories. However, being in the low-increasing conflict trajectory was linked to high risk behavior (b=0.40), adolescent depression (b=0.97), and hopelessness (b=0.92). Parent depression independently predicted high risk behavior (b=0.11), adolescent depression (b=0.18), and hopelessness (b=0.23). Summary/Implications. The observed differences in patterns of support versus those of conflict point to the specificity in the developing parent-child relationship, with greater differences for emotional adjustment than for involvement in high risk behaviors. The findings emphasize the need to design early interventions to strengthen PCRQ, to sustain parental support throughout adolescents, and to diminish PCR conflict and reduce the concomitant risk of adolescent maladjustment.
Keywords:
Parent Child Relations; Adolescent development
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4864
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTRAJECTORIES OF PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP QUALITY: PREDICTORS AND CONSEQUENCESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211684-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims. To advance understanding of resilience processes essential to the promotion of healthy adolescent development, this study examined changes and stabilities in parent-child relationship quality (PCRQ). Study aims were to: (1) describe trajectories of PCRQ, defined in terms of relationship support and conflict; (2) examine the influence of adolescent and parent factors on PCRQ trajectory membership; and (3) test the effects of PCRQ trajectory membership on adolescent developmental outcomes (depression, high risk behavior). Background/Significance. Resilience theory, the conceptual basis for this research, posits that the interaction of risk factors (e.g., parent depression) and protective factors (e.g., relationship support and conflict) are processes central to adolescent adaptation. The resilience approach seeks to understand how protective factors influence or buffer the risks that adolescents experience, focusing away from the more limited deficit models used to describe adolescent problem behaviors and related developmental outcomes. Current research has uncovered compelling associations between maternal/parent depression and child developmental outcomes, but little is known about the effects of parent depression on longer-term relationship development and related outcomes. Few studies have examined the differentiation of parent-child relationship patterns across time; thus, little knowledge exists about predictors of PCRQ or its impact on child developmental outcomes, such as or adolescent depression and involvement in high risk behavior. Methods. Using data drawn from the PAYS study, the sample included youth (N=110) at risk for school failure or dropout and their parents (typically mothers).  Adolescent perception of PCRQ, measured in terms of perceived support and conflict, was assessed 5 times across a 2-year period. Predictor variables included child age, gender, and depression, and parent age, education level, and depression. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify trajectories of PCR support and conflict; multiple and multinomial regression were used to examine antecedents and consequences associated with the trajectories. Results.  For parent-child relationship support, a single class was the best fitting model. Child gender and depression (b=-1.13, b=-0.57) and parent depression and education (b=-1.16, b=-0.92) were significant predictors of PCR support.  PCR support predicted decreased youth depression (b=-0.09) and hopelessness (b=-0.09). For relationship conflict, three trajectories characterized the best fitting model: (1) low conflict, increasing across time, (2) high and decreasing, and (3) low and stable conflict. Child and parent factors did not predict membership in PCR conflict trajectories. However, being in the low-increasing conflict trajectory was linked to high risk behavior (b=0.40), adolescent depression (b=0.97), and hopelessness (b=0.92). Parent depression independently predicted high risk behavior (b=0.11), adolescent depression (b=0.18), and hopelessness (b=0.23). Summary/Implications. The observed differences in patterns of support versus those of conflict point to the specificity in the developing parent-child relationship, with greater differences for emotional adjustment than for involvement in high risk behaviors. The findings emphasize the need to design early interventions to strengthen PCRQ, to sustain parental support throughout adolescents, and to diminish PCR conflict and reduce the concomitant risk of adolescent maladjustment.en_GB
dc.subjectParent Child Relationsen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescent developmenten_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:19Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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